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california_storms_54844.jpg

In this Friday, Feb. 17, 2017 satellite image released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) shows a powerful storm beginning to move into California as the saturated state faces a new round of wet weather that could trigger flooding and debris flows around the northern region. The brunt of the storm is expected to affect Southern California starting around midday Friday and into Saturday. Forecasters say rain will also spread into Central California and up to the San Francisco Bay Area. But the National Weather Service says only scattered light showers are occurring in the region north of Sacramento, where the damaged Oroville Dam continues to release water in advance of new storms. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP)

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northeast_snow_83809.jpg

This National Weather Service RIDGE Radar image provided by NOAA shows a storm system moving across the United States, Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017, at 10:48 p.m. EST. A densely populated swath of the Northeast was preparing for winter's harshest thump yet, a fast-moving storm that could bring more than a foot of snow, strong winds and coastal flooding. (NOAA via AP)

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mackerel_volcano_00999.jpg

In this 1891 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Penobscot Bay fishermen clean mackerel near their saltwater farm off the Maine coast. Scientists with the University of Massachusetts and other institutions made the findings while conducting research about a long-ago climate calamity in New England that was caused by the eruption of Mount Tambora in Indonesia in 1815. (NOAA/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP)

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fewer_mild_days_73605.jpg

In this image provided by Karin van der Wiel/ NOAA/ Princeton University, shows climate change effects on patterns of mild weather. Kiss goodbye some of those postcard-perfect, ideal-for-outdoor-wedding days. A new study said global warming is going to steal some of those exceedingly pleasant weather days from our future. On average, Earth will have four fewer days of mild and mostly dry weather by 2035 and ten fewer of them by the end of the century, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather. (Karin van der Wiel/ NOAA/ Princeton University via AP)

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hungry_planet_fish_farms_19685.jpg

In this Sept. 17, 2015, image made from video provided by NOAA Fisheries, a diver swims near a fish farm off the shore of Hawaii's Big Island near Kona. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is creating a plan for managing commercial fish farms, known as aquaculture, in federal waters around the Pacific - a program similar to one recently implemented by NOAA in the Gulf of Mexico. The farms in the Gulf and the Pacific would be the only aquaculture operations in U.S. federal waters. (Paul B. Hillman/NOAA Fisheries via AP)

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hungry_planet_fish_farms_12591.jpg

In this Sept. 17, 2015, image made from video provided by NOAA Fisheries, a diver swims amongst a fish farm off the shore of Hawaii's Big Island near Kona. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is creating a plan for managing commercial fish farms, known as aquaculture, in federal waters around the Pacific - a program similar to one recently implemented by NOAA in the Gulf of Mexico. The farms in the Gulf and the Pacific would be the only aquaculture operations in U.S. federal waters. (Paul B. Hillman/NOAA Fisheries via AP)

hungry_planet_fish_farms_22110.jpg

hungry_planet_fish_farms_22110.jpg

This Sept. 17, 2015, image made from video provided by NOAA Fisheries, shows a fish farm off the shore of Hawaii's Big Island near Kona. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is creating a plan for managing commercial fish farms, known as aquaculture, in federal waters around the Pacific - a program similar to one recently implemented by NOAA in the Gulf of Mexico. The farms in the Gulf and the Pacific would be the only aquaculture operations in U.S. federal waters. (Paul B. Hillman/NOAA Fisheries via AP)

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hurricane_matthew_october_7_2016_45022.jpg

This image provided by NOAA. taken Oct. 7, 2016, shows Hurricane Matthew over the Southeastern part of the U.S. A new study finds wind and water shifts during busy hurricane seasons seem to provide a somewhat protective barrier for the U.S. coast. Last year’s Hurricane Matthew, which was a major storm and hit Haiti with 145 mph winds but fizzled as it neared the American mainland, is a good example.This Oct. 7, 2016 satellite image shows Matthew as it threatens Florida, but it later hit South Carolina as a minimal hurricane with 75 mph winds. (NOAA via AP)

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hurricane_barrier_20660.jpg

This image provided by NOAA NCEI shows a hurricane buffer zone on the Southeastern part of the U.S. A new study finds that subtle shifts in winds and water temperature during busy hurricane seasons often ends up providing a protective barrier or buffer that often weakens storms as they approach the U.S. coast. This handout image from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Center for Environmental Information shows where the buffer zone is, based on ocean temperatures and changes in winds over decades. (NOAA NCEI via AP)

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FILE - This September 2015 photo provided by NOAA Fisheries shows an adult female orca, identified as J-16, as she's about to surface with her youngest calf, born earlier in the year, near the San Juan Islands in Washington state's Puget Sound. Whale researchers who track the small endangered population of Puget Sound orcas say three whales are believed dead or missing since summer. The Center for Whale Research says that as of Friday, Oct. 28, 2016, there are only 80 animals. Two females and a 10-month old calf are believed gone. (NOAA Fisheries/Vancouver Aquarium via AP, File)

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This map provided by NOAA shows the winter temperature outlook for the U.S. Federal forecasters say thanks to a nascent La Nina it is likely to be warmer and drier than normal down south, colder and wetter up north and in the middle it’s hard to say what’s going to happen, sort of meh.And it doesn’t look good for drought-hit California. (NOAA via AP)

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CORRECTS DAY OF WEEK TO THURSDAY, NOT WEDNESDAY - This GOES East satellite image provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), shows Hurricane Matthew moving northwest of Cuba towards the Atlantic coast of southern Florida, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016. Matthew was upgraded to a Category 4 hurricane late Thursday morning, with top sustained winds of 140 mph. The storm was blamed for more than 100 deaths in Haiti alone, and officials in Florida urged residents of the Sunshine State to prepare for what could be widespread and massive damage. (NOAA via AP)

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Tropical Weather.JPEG-1ccb0.jpg

The GOES East satellite image provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and taken Monday, Oct. 3, 2016, at 9:15 a.m. EDT, shows Hurricane Matthew about 220 miles southeast of Kingston, Jamaica. Hurricane Matthew roared across the southwestern tip of Haiti with 145 mph winds Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016, uprooting trees and tearing roofs from homes in a largely rural corner of the impoverished country as the storm headed north toward Cuba and the east coast of Florida. (NOAA via AP)

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In this 2009 photo provided by NOAA and the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory, fish swim in a mesophotic coral ecosystem about 230 feet deep in the in Au'au Channel off Maui, Hawaii. Coral reefs in Hawaii’s oceanic twilight zone, the deep area of ocean where light still penetrates and photosynthesis occurs, are abundant and home to a wide variety of regionally unique fish species. A paper published Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016 said that some of the reefs off the archipelago are the most extensive deep-water reef ecosystem ever recorded. (NOAA and Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory via AP)

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In this Sept. 2016 photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a glass squid that was found off the coast of Hawaii's Big Island is shown. Federal researchers just returned from an expedition to study the biodiversity and mechanisms of an unusually rich deep-sea ecosystem off the coast of Hawaii. (NOAA via AP)

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toxic_algae_bloom.jpeg

FILE - In this undated file photo provided by NOAA Fisheries, NOAA researchers pour a sample of sea water containing a brownish toxic algae into a jar aboard a research vessel off the Washington Coast. A new study finds that unusually warm Pacific Ocean temperatures helped cause a massive toxic algae bloom last year that closed lucrative fisheries from California to British Columbia and disrupted marine life from seabirds to sea lions, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016. Scientists linked the patch of warm ocean water, nicknamed the "blob," to the vast ribbon of toxic algae that flourished in 2015. (NOAA Fisheries via AP, File)

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This NOAA satellite image taken Friday, April 1, 2016 at 12:45 AM EDT shows a cold front extending from the Great Lakes southward into the Gulf of Mexico. Severe storms will sweep across the Southeast along this cold front. Some tornadoes are possible. (NOAA/Weather Underground via AP)

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11262015_b1smithlgnoaa8201.jpg

Illustration on NOAA's climate change fictions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

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HURRICANE.jpg

This NOAA satellite image taken Monday, Oct. 26, 2015, at 01:00 AM EDT shows weakening Hurricane Olaf well east of Hawaii. (NOAA/Weather Underground via AP) ** FILE **

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This NOAA satellite image taken Monday, Aug. 31, 2015, at 01:00 AM EDT, shows a frontal boundary draped across the Rockies through the southwestern United States, producing showers and thunderstorms. There are two powerful hurricanes currently moving through the Pacific Ocean. In the central Pacific, east of Hawaii, is Hurricane Ignacio, which currently has sustained winds of 115 mph. Hurricane Jimena is to the southeast of Ignacio in the eastern Pacific which maximum sustained winds of 150 mph. (NOAA/Weather Underground via AP)