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FILE - This June 6, 2013, file photo, shows a sign outside the National Security Administration (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md. The Senate Intelligence Committee three years ago secretly considered, but ultimately rejected, alternate ways for the National Security Agency to collect and store massive amounts of Americans’ phone records, The Associated Press has learned. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

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House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., right, accompanied by the committee's ranking member Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, D-Md., inform reporters about proposed changes to the National Security Agency’s program of sweeping up and storing vast amounts of data on Americans' phone calls, Tuesday, March 25, 214, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Details of the government's secret phone records collection program were disclosed last year by former NSA systems analyst Edward Snowden. Privacy advocates were outraged to learn that the government was holding onto phone records of innocent Americans for up to five years. Obama promised to make changes to the program in an effort to win back public support. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., right, accompanied by the committee's ranking member Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, D-Md., inform reporters about proposed changes to the National Security Agency’s program of sweeping up and storing vast amounts of data on Americans' phone calls, Tuesday, March 25, 2014, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Details of the government's secret phone records collection program were disclosed last year by former NSA systems analyst Edward Snowden. Privacy advocates were outraged to learn that the government was holding onto phone records of innocent Americans for up to five years. Obama promised to make changes to the program in an effort to win back public support. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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In this Jan. 29, 2014, photo, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper listens as he testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on current and projected national security threats against the U.S. Clapper, said this week that the loss of state secrets as a result of leaks by former National Security Agency analyst Edward Snowden was the worst in American history. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

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Navy Vice Adm. Michael Rogers, nominated to head Cybercom and the National Security Agency, says the Russian military is using sophisticated cyberwarfare capabilities against Ukraine as part of its incursion in Crimea. (Associated Press)

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Navy Vice Adm. Michael Rogers, nominated to head Cybercom and the National Security Agency, says the Russian military is using sophisticated cyberwarfare capabilities against Ukraine as part of its incursion in Crimea. (Associated Press)

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National Security Agency (NSA) Director Gen. Keith Alexander testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2013, before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on "Continued Oversight of U.S. Government Surveillance Authorities" . (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

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**FILE** Gen. Keith B. Alexander, director of the National Security Agency and head of the U.S. Cyber Command, testifies before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on Capitol Hill in Washington on June 18, 2013. (Associated Press)

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FILE - This June 6, 2013 file photo shows a sign outside the National Security Agency (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md. A Brooklyn man serving a 15-year terrorism sentence hopes to challenge his conviction because the Justice Department only recently revealed to him it obtained evidence using one of the National Security Agency’s secret surveillance programs. The notification was a result of a new Justice Department policy after last year's disclosures by NSA leaker Edward Snowden and could lead to the reopening of many cases already closed. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

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Dan McCall is photogrpahed in his home on Nov. 29, 2011 in Sauk Rapids, Minn. Federal authorities have dropped an attempt to stop a Minnesota man from marketing merchandise poking fun at the National Security Agency for its surveillance of citizens, including T-shirts bearing the NSA's official seal and the slogan, "The only part of the government that actually listens." The settlement was filed in federal court in Maryland on Tuesday. The NSA agreed to acknowledge that McCall's designs were intended as parody, and the NSA and DHS both agreed to formally retract their claims that his merchandise violated federal law. (AP Photo/The St. Cloud Times, Dave Schwarz)

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Dan McCall is photogrpahed in his home on Nov. 29, 2011 in Sauk Rapids, Minn. Federal authorities have dropped an attempt to stop a Minnesota man from marketing merchandise poking fun at the National Security Agency for its surveillance of citizens, including T-shirts bearing the NSA's official seal and the slogan, "The only part of the government that actually listens." The settlement was filed in federal court in Maryland on Tuesday. The NSA agreed to acknowledge that McCall's designs were intended as parody, and the NSA and DHS both agreed to formally retract their claims that his merchandise violated federal law. (AP Photo/The St. Cloud Times, Dave Schwarz)