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Illustration on Pakistan's radicalization by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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Pakistan's Afghanistan Policies Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

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Pakistan Navy soldiers patrol in Gwadar port, about 700 kilometers (435 miles) west of Karachi, Pakistan, Monday, April 11, 2016. Gwadar Port is a deep-sea port developed jointly by the Pakistan and China at a cost of USD $248 million. In 2013, Gwadar Port operations were officially handed over to China. Gwadar is the key to the trade portion of the China Pakistan Economic Corridor, a $46 billion program in which Beijing will also build power plants in Pakistan to plug an energy shortage. (AP Photo/Anjum Naveed)

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Pakistani Ambassador Asad Majeed Khan lamented during a wide-ranging interview that millions of people inside Indian-controlled Jammu and Kashmir have been on lockdown without access to medicine or electricity.

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Illustration on the nuclear balace of India and Pakistan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

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Pakistani soldiers patrol in the area where Indian planes launched a pre-dawn airstrike inside Pakistan. Pakistan's military said Wednesday it shot down two Indian warplanes in the disputed region of Kashmir and captured two pilots. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

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Pakistan Christians pray for Asia Bibi, a Catholic mother of five who has been on death row since 2010 accused of blasphemy in Multan, Pakistan. Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018. Pakistan's top court on Wednesday acquitted Bibi who was sentenced to death under the country's controversial blasphemy law, a landmark ruling that sparked protests by hard-line Islamists and raised fears of violence. (AP Photo/Irum Asim)

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Illustration on elections in Turkey and Pakistan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

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Pakistan region map

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Illustration on Pakistan and Secretary Tillerson by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

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Pakistani Foreign Minister Khawaja Asif attempted to cool the temperature of relations with Washington after President Trump called Pakistan a haven for terrorists. "The bilateral relationship between the U.S. and Pakistan has taken a new turn," Mr. Asif said. (Associated Press)

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In this Thursday, June 15, 2017, photo, Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif speaks to reporters outside the premises of the Joint Investigation Team, in Islamabad, Pakistan. Pakistan's Supreme Court in a unanimous decision has asked the country's anti-corruption body to file corruption charges against Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, his two sons and daughter for concealing their assets. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)

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Unidentified members of a village council stand with a police officer, right, at a police station in Muzaffarabad, Pakistan, Thursday, July 27, 2017. Police on Thursday arrested the head of a village council in central Pakistan for allegedly sanctioning the rape of a teenage girl, a police spokeswoman said, as Amnesty International demanded ban on such councils. (AP Photo/Arif Ali)

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In this Friday, July 7, 2017 photo, Haroon Baloch, a Pakistani social media rights activist looks at a Facebook page of a religious group, that refers to their leader as a "true leader," in Islamabad, Pakistan. A senior Pakistani government official said more than 40 of 65 organizations banned in Pakistan operate flourishing social media sites, communicating on Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp and Telegram to recruit, raise money and demand a rigid Islamic system. Meanwhile Pakistan is waging a cyber war against activists and journalists who use social media to criticize the government and its agencies. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)

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In this Saturday, July 9, 2017 photo, journalist Zafar Achakzai, who was held for sharing content criticizing security forces on social media, sits in his office after being released from jail, in Quetta, Pakistan. A senior Pakistani government official says more than 40 of 65 organizations banned in Pakistan are operating flourishing social media sites. Meanwhile, Pakistan is waging a cyber crackdown on activists and journalists who use social media to criticize the government, the military or the intelligence agencies. (AP Photo/Arshad Butt)

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In this Friday, July 7, 2017 photo, a social media rights activist points to a Facebook page of a militant group featuring their late leaders, describing them as, "innocent martyrs," in Islamabad, Pakistan. A senior Pakistani government official said more than 40 of 65 organizations banned in Pakistan operate flourishing social media sites, communicating on Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp and Telegram to recruit, raise money and demand a rigid Islamic system. Meanwhile Pakistan is waging a cyber war against activists and journalists who use social media to criticize the government and its agencies. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)

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In this Friday, July 7, 2017 photo, Pakistani social media rights activist Haroon Baloch, talks to The Associated Press in Islamabad, Pakistan. A senior Pakistani government official said more than 40 of 65 organizations banned in Pakistan operate flourishing social media sites, communicating on Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp and Telegram to recruit, raise money and demand a rigid Islamic system. Meanwhile, Pakistan is waging a cyber crackdown on activists and journalists who use social media to criticize the government, the military or the intelligence agencies. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)

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This Friday, July 7, 2017 photo, shows a Facebook site that features one of India’s most wanted, Hafiz Saeed, the founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, a banned organization and a U.S. declared terrorist group, in Islamabad, Pakistan. A senior Pakistani government official says more than 40 of 65 organizations banned in Pakistan operate flourishing social media sites, communicating on Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp and Telegram to recruit, raise money and demand a rigid Islamic system. Meanwhile Pakistan is waging a cyber war against activists and journalists who use social media to criticize the government and its agencies. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)

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Manchester United legend Ryan Giggs, right, speaks next to Brazilian soccer star Ronaldinho, during a press conference in Lahore, Pakistan, Sunday, July 9, 2017. Ronaldinho and Giggs were among the soccer stars that arrived in Pakistan to play exhibition matches which organizers hope will boost the sport in the country. (AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary)

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Pakistani workers install advertising boards featuring Ronaldinho, Ryan Gigs and other soccer stars at a stadium ahead of exhibition soccer match in Karachi, Pakistan, Saturday, July 8, 2017. Ronaldinho and Ryan Giggs were among soccer stars to arrive in Pakistan on Saturday to play exhibition matches which organizers hope will boost the sport in the country. (AP Photo/Fareed Khan)