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This Monday, April 10, 2017, photo shows the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia. With muskets polished, flags aloft and one very commanding tent in place, the museum is at the ready. After nearly two decades of planning, the museum that tells the dramatic story of the founding of the United States opens in prime historic Philadelphia on April 19. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

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FILE - In this Monday, Oct. 24, 2016 file photo, construction continues on the exterior at the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia. Philadelphia's Museum of the American Revolution says it has exceeded its $150 million fundraising effort, just weeks before it opens to the public on April 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma, File)

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FILE – In this July 3, 2002, file photo, re-enactor Ralph Archbold, portraying Benjamin Franklin, waits to board the world's largest U.S. flag-shaped hot air balloon, during an event marking the one-year countdown to the opening of the National Constitution Center under construction on Independence Mall in Philadelphia. Archbold, who portrayed Franklin in Philadelphia for more than 40 years, died Saturday, March 25, 2017, at age 75, according to the Alleva Funeral Home in Paoli, Pa. (AP Photo/Brad C Bower, File)

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FILE – In this Jan. 17, 2006, file photo, re-enactor Ralph Archbold, portraying Benjamin Franklin, applauds during a party to mark the 300th anniversary of Franklin's birth on Jan. 17, 1706, in Philadelphia. Archbold, who portrayed Benjamin Franklin in Philadelphia for more than 40 years, died Saturday, March 25, 2017, at age 75, according to the Alleva Funeral Home in Paoli, Pa. (AP Photo/Joseph Kaczmarek, File)

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Federal Bureau of Investigations Special Agent Jacob Archer points to distinctive marks caused by a pool cue on a newly recovered Norman Rockwell painting stolen more than 40 years ago, during a news conference at the federal building in Philadelphia, Friday, March 31, 2017. The painting, sometimes called "Lazybones" or "Boy Asleep with Hoe," graced the cover of the Sept. 6, 1919, edition of the Saturday Evening Post. The oil-on-canvas piece was among several items taken during a 1976 break-in in Cherry Hill, N.J. a Philadelphia suburb. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

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John Grant shakes hands with Federal Bureau of Investigations Special Agent Jacob Archer after taking custody of a recovered Norman Rockwell painting during a news conference at the federal building in Philadelphia, Friday, March 31, 2017. The painting, owned by Grant’s father, Robert, was sometimes called "Lazybones" or "Boy Asleep with Hoe," graced the cover of the Sept. 6, 1919, edition of the Saturday Evening Post. The oil-on-canvas piece was among several items taken during a 1976 break-in in Cherry Hill, N.J. a Philadelphia suburb. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

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The Federal Bureau of Investigations Special Agents Don Asper, left, and Jacob Archer displays a recovered Norman Rockwell painting stolen more than 40 years ago, during a news conference at the federal building in Philadelphia, Friday, March 31, 2017. The painting, sometimes called "Lazybones" or "Boy Asleep with Hoe," graced the cover of the Sept. 6, 1919, edition of the Saturday Evening Post. The oil-on-canvas piece was among several items taken during a 1976 break-in in Cherry Hill, N.J., a Philadelphia suburb. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

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Emily Murta, right, and Kaitlin Grant embrace during a news conference regarding the newly recovered Norman Rockwell painting, that belonged to their grandfather Robert Grant and was stolen more than 40 years ago, at the federal building in Philadelphia, Friday, March 31, 2017. The painting, sometimes called "Lazybones" or "Boy Asleep with Hoe," graced the cover of the Sept. 6, 1919, edition of the Saturday Evening Post. The oil-on-canvas piece was among several items taken during a 1976 break-in in Cherry Hill, N.J. a Philadelphia suburb. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

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Ottawa Senators' Alexandre Burrows, top, tries to get a round Philadelphia Flyers' Sean Couturier during the third period of an NHL hockey game, Tuesday, March 28, 2017, in Philadelphia. Philadelphia won 3-2 in a shootout. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

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Philadelphia Flyers' Steve Mason, top, blocks a shot by Ottawa Senators' Tom Pyatt during a shootout in an NHL hockey game, Tuesday, March 28, 2017, in Philadelphia. Philadelphia won 3-2. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

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Philadelphia Flyers' Steve Mason, center, and Jakub Voracek, right, celebrate as Ottawa Senators' Tom Pyatt, left, skates past after a shootout in an NHL hockey game, Tuesday, March 28, 2017, in Philadelphia. Philadelphia won 3-2. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

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Ottawa Senators' Craig Anderson, left, blocks a shot by Philadelphia Flyers' Shayne Gostisbehere during overtime of an NHL hockey game, Tuesday, March 28, 2017, in Philadelphia. Philadelphia won 3-2 in a shootout. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

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Philadelphia Flyers' Jordan Weal, left, scores a goal against Ottawa Senators' Craig Anderson during a shootout in an NHL hockey game, Tuesday, March 28, 2017, in Philadelphia. Philadelphia won 3-2. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

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CORRECTS NAME OF SUBJECT TO PHILADELPHIA ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY HUGH J. BURNS JR., NOT MONSIGNOR WILLIAM LYNN; CORRECTS NAME OF SUBJECT TO PHILADELPHIA ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY PATRICK BLESSINGTON, NOT THOMAS BERGSTROM-Philadelphia Assistant District Attorney Hugh J. Burns Jr., left, talks with Philadelphia Assistant District Attorney Patrick Blessington as they leave a hearing at the Center for Criminal Justice, Friday, March 24, 2017 in Philadelphia. A judge has cleared the way for prosecutors to retry the former Philadelphia church official imprisoned over his handling of abuse complaints. Monsignor William Lynn served nearly three years of a three- to six-year sentence when the Pennsylvania Supreme Court tossed his conviction over trial errors. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

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FBI special agent in charge Michael Harpster, left, speaks during a news conference announcing corruption charges against Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Philadelphia. Williams, Philadelphia's top prosecutor, was charged Tuesday with taking more than $160,000 in luxury gifts, Caribbean trips and cash, often in exchange for official favors that included help with a court case, according to a bribery and extortion indictment unsealed Tuesday. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

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Greg Floyd, left, acting special agent in charge of the IRS-criminal Investigation, Philadelphia Office, speaks during a news conference announcing corruption charges against Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Philadelphia. Williams, Philadelphia's top prosecutor, was charged Tuesday with taking more than $160,000 in luxury gifts, Caribbean trips and cash, often in exchange for official favors that included help with a court case, according to a bribery and extortion indictment unsealed Tuesday. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

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Acting New Jersey U.S. Attorney William E. Fitzpatrick speaks during a news conference announcing corruption charges against Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Philadelphia. Williams, Philadelphia's top prosecutor, was charged Tuesday with taking more than $160,000 in luxury gifts, Caribbean trips and cash, often in exchange for official favors that included help with a court case, according to a bribery and extortion indictment unsealed Tuesday. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

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Acting New Jersey U.S. Attorney William E. Fitzpatrick speaks during a news conference announcing corruption charges against Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Philadelphia. Williams, Philadelphia's top prosecutor, was charged Tuesday with taking more than $160,000 in luxury gifts, Caribbean trips and cash, often in exchange for official favors that included help with a court case, according to a bribery and extortion indictment unsealed Tuesday. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

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Acting New Jersey U.S. Attorney William E. Fitzpatrick speaks during a news conference announcing corruption charges against Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Philadelphia. Williams, Philadelphia's top prosecutor, was charged Tuesday with taking more than $160,000 in luxury gifts, Caribbean trips and cash, often in exchange for official favors that included help with a court case, according to a bribery and extortion indictment unsealed Tuesday. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

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philadelphia_prosecutor_gifts_50938.jpg

Acting New Jersey U.S. Attorney William E. Fitzpatrick speaks during a news conference announcing corruption charges against Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Philadelphia. Williams, Philadelphia's top prosecutor, was charged Tuesday with taking more than $160,000 in luxury gifts, Caribbean trips and cash, often in exchange for official favors that included help with a court case, according to a bribery and extortion indictment unsealed Tuesday. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)