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In this May 26, 2017, photo is an entrance into the Indiana slum, where several houses were demolished in the lead-up to the Olympics, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Despite being more than three miles away from the closest Olympic venue, the northern community of Indiana was also targeted for eviction. More than 70,000 people were displaced to make way for last year’s Rio de Janeiro’s Olympics. (AP Photo/Liliana Michelena)

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In this July 27, 2017 photo, children play with a foam board in the polluted Guanabara bay, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Rio organizers promised to clean up polluted Guanabara Bay in their winning bid in 2009. During the Olympics, officials used stop-gap measures to keep floating sofas, logs, and dead animals from crashing into boats during the sailing events. Since the Olympics, the bankrupt state of Rio de Janeiro has ceased major efforts to clean the bay, with the unwelcome stench usually drifting along the highway from the international airport. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

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In this July 27, 2017 photo, trash lays on the coast of Guanabara bay in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Rio organizers promised to clean up polluted Guanabara Bay in their winning bid in 2009. Since the Olympics, the bankrupt state of Rio de Janeiro has ceased major efforts to clean the bay, with the unwelcome stench usually drifting along the highway from the international airport. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

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In this July 27, 2017 photo, trash lays on the coast of Guanabara bay, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Rio organizers promised to clean up polluted Guanabara Bay in their winning bid in 2009. During the Olympics, officials used stop-gap measures to keep floating sofas, logs, and dead animals from crashing into boats during the sailing events. Since the Olympics, the bankrupt state of Rio de Janeiro has ceased major efforts to clean the bay, with the unwelcome stench usually drifting along the highway from the international airport. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

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FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2016 file photo, Brazil's Neymar kisses the ball before scoring the decisive penalty kick during the final match of the mens's Olympic football tournament at the Maracana stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. As Rio de Janeiro reels from corruption, rising crime and unfinished infrastructure, its residents can look no further than the iconic image of Neymar to remind them of the Rio de Janeiro Olympics that took place one year ago and the price they payed for hosting the games. (AP Photo/Leo Correa, File)

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FILE - In this July 4, 2016 file photo, Sugar loaf mountain and Guanabara bay are seen behind the Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Rio organizers promised to clean up polluted Guanabara Bay in their winning bid in 2009. During the Olympics, officials used stop-gap measures to keep floating sofas, logs, and dead animals from crashing into boats during the sailing events. Since the Olympics, the bankrupt state of Rio de Janeiro has ceased major efforts to clean the bay, with the unwelcome stench usually drifting along the highway from the international airport. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

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In this July 6, 2017 photo, the "Museum of Yesterday" app is seen on a cell phone showing information on slave deposits in the late 18th century, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Before abolishing slavery in 1888, becoming the last country in the Americas to do so, Brazil was the world's largest slave market. The new app seeks to educate visitors about the history and role of Rio de Janeiro’s revitalized port in colonization, slavery and even recent corruption investigations.(AP Photo/Renata Brito)

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In this July 6, 2017 photo, the "Museum of Yesterday" app is seen on a cell phone showing information on kickbacks received by jailed lawmaker Eduardo Cunha, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Cunha is accused of receiving 52 million reais ($16 million) in bribes related to the port renovation. He was also sentenced to 15 years and four months in prison for another corruption scheme at state-run Petrobras. The app seeks to educate visitors about the history and role of Rio de Janeiro’s revitalized port in colonization, slavery and even recent corruption investigations.(AP Photo/Renata Brito)

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In this July 9, 2017 photo, the Docas Warehouse is seen from the Valongo Wharf, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The warehouse was built in 1971 by one of Brazil's first black engineers and slave abolitionist Andre Rebouças. A new app called “Museum of Yesterday” seeks to educate visitors about the history and role of Rio de Janeiro’s revitalized port in colonization, slavery and even recent corruption investigations. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)

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In this July 9, 2017 photo, a visitor poses for a picture in front of the Museum of Tomorrow in the renovated port area in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A new app called “Museum of Yesterday” seeks to educate visitors about the history and role of Rio de Janeiro’s revitalized port in colonization, slavery and even recent corruption investigations. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)

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In this July 9, 2017 photo, boys ride their bikes in front of houses that were once slave deposits in the late 18th century in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Before abolishing slavery in 1888, becoming the last country in the Americas to do so, Brazil was the world's largest slave market. A new app called “Museum of Yesterday” seeks to educate visitors about the history and role of Rio de Janeiro’s revitalized port in colonization, slavery and even recent corruption investigations. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)

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In this July 9, 2017 photo, remnants of a house that was once used a slave deposit in the late 18th century stands in the port area in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Before abolishing slavery in 1888, becoming the last country in the Americas to do so, Brazil was the world's largest slave market. A new app called “Museum of Yesterday” seeks to educate visitors about the history and role of Rio de Janeiro’s revitalized port in colonization, slavery and even recent corruption investigations. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)

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In this July 6, 2017 photo, Brazil's first skyscraper is seen behind palm trees in Praca Maua, at the heart of the renovated port area in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The 22-story building named "The Night" was constructed in 1929 and is part of Brazil's national heritage. A new app called “Museum of Yesterday” seeks to educate visitors about the history and role of Rio de Janeiro’s revitalized port in colonization, slavery and even recent corruption investigations. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)

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In this July 9, 2017 photo, women sit in front of a mural by street artist Kobra in the renovated port area in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A new app called “Museum of Yesterday” seeks to educate visitors about the history and role of Rio de Janeiro’s revitalized port in colonization, slavery and even recent corruption investigations. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)

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In this July 9, 2017 photo, tourists read an information sign at the Valongo Wharf where hundreds of thousands of enslaved Africans debarked from their harrowing journey across the Atlantic, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The archeological pit was named a UNESCO world heritage site but tourists complain there is little information about it available on street signs. A new app called “Museum of Yesterday” seeks to educate visitors about the history and role of Rio de Janeiro’s revitalized port in colonization, slavery and even recent corruption investigations. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)

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In this July 9, 2017 photo, tourists look at murals in the renovated port area in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A new app called “Museum of Yesterday” seeks to educate visitors about the history and role of Rio de Janeiro’s revitalized port in colonization, slavery and even recent corruption investigations. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)

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In this July 6, 2017 photo, the "Museum of Yesterday" app is seen on a cell phone showing an old photograph of the port area before it was renovated, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The new app seeks to educate visitors about the history and role of Rio de Janeiro’s revitalized port in colonization, slavery and even recent corruption investigations. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)

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File - In this July 7, 2016 file photo, Odebrecht personnel work on the Line 4 of the subway that is under construction in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Former Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes, the moving force behind organizing last year's Olympics, is being investigated as one of dozens of top politicians implicated for accepting at least 15 million Brazil reals ($5 million) in payments from construction giant Odebrecht to facilitate construction projects tied to the Games. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo, File)

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File - In this Aug. 3, 2016 file photo, Rio de Janeiro's Mayor Eduardo Paes, center, holds the Olympic torch, while members of the Mangueira samba school dance, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The former Rio de Janeiro Mayor, the moving force behind organizing last year's Olympics, is being investigated for accepting at least 15 million Brazil reals ($5 million) in payments to facilitate construction projects tied to the Games. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo, File)

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Rio de Janeiro's favelas is depicted in the Latin American section of the Gulliver's Gate exhibit, Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in New York. The installation opens to the public on May 9, 2017. The indoor 49,000-square-foot diorama includes scale models of structures and landscapes from the Brooklyn Bridge and the Eiffel Tower to the pyramids of Egypt and China's Forbidden City, along with the Taj Mahal, Mecca, Niagara Falls and Rio de Janeiro's Christ the Redeemer statue. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)