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This is a sign in a Starbucks located in downtown Pittsburgh on Saturday, March 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

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This is a sign in a Starbucks located in downtown Pittsburgh on Saturday, March 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

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Illustration on the Starbucks' sensitivity training situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

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Protesters gather outside of a Starbucks in Philadelphia, Sunday, April 15, 2018, where two black men were arrested Thursday after employees called police to say the men were trespassing. The arrest prompted accusations of racism on social media. Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson posted a lengthy statement Saturday night, calling the situation "disheartening" and that it led to a "reprehensible" outcome. (Michael Bryant/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)

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AP_18084051021227.jpg

This is a sign in a Starbucks located in downtown Pittsburgh on Saturday, March 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

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Starbucks hero.jpg

A Starbucks robbery in Fresno, California, was thwarted on July 20, 2017, when customer Cregg Jerry used one of the establishment's chairs as a weapon. (KPIX-5 CBS San Francisco screenshot)

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Build a Wal Starbacks.jpg

Starbucks customer Kayla Hart was ridiculed by Starbucks baristas on Wednesday, June 14, 2017, and given a cup labeled "Build a Wall." The company issued an apology when contacted by a Fox News affiliate in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Fox 46 Charlotte screenshot)

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A Starbucks Unicorn Frappuccino drink sits on display, Thursday, April 20, 2017, in Philadelphia. Starbucks' entry into the unicorn food craze was released Wednesday and its popularity was too much for Colorado barista Braden Burson. He posted a video on Twitter complaining that the drink was difficult to make and he's "never been so stressed out" in his life. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

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starbucks_frappuccino_rant_84273.jpg

A Starbucks Unicorn Frappuccino drink sits on display, Thursday, April 20, 2017, in Philadelphia. Starbucks' entry into the unicorn food craze was released Wednesday and its popularity was too much for Colorado barista Braden Burson. He posted a video on Twitter complaining that the drink was difficult to make and he's "never been so stressed out" in his life. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

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A Starbucks Unicorn Frappuccino drink sits on display, Thursday, April 20, 2017, in Philadelphia. Starbucks' entry into the unicorn food craze was released Wednesday and its popularity was too much for Colorado barista Braden Burson. He posted a video on Twitter complaining that the drink was difficult to make and he's "never been so stressed out" in his life. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

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Starbucks Shareholders Meeting.JPEG-0b4f3.jpg

Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz speaks at Starbucks annual shareholders meeting in Seattle on March 22, 2017. (Associated Press) **FILE**

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In this image taken on Monday, Feb. 27, 2017, palm trees are planted in a flowerbed in front of Milan's gothic-era Duomo Cathedral, subsidized by Starbucks cafeteria chain for the next three years in Milan, Italy. Longtime CEO Howard Schultz's vision for Starbucks was largely inspired by the Milan coffee bars he experienced on his first trip to the northern Italian city in 1983. Schultz will continue on with the company to open ''the quintessential Roastery'' in Milan by the end of 2018. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

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In this image taken on Monday, Feb. 27, 2017, a view of the old headquarters of the Italian post during renovation works to host the Starbucks cafeteria in Milan, Italy. Longtime CEO Howard Schultz's vision for Starbucks was largely inspired by the Milan coffee bars he experienced on his first trip to the northern Italian city in 1983. Schultz will continue on with the company to open ''the quintessential Roastery'' in Milan by the end of 2018. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

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In this image taken on Monday, Feb. 27, 2017, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz gestures during an interview with the Associated Press at a Princi bakery in Milan, Italy. Longtime CEO Howard Schultz's vision for Starbucks was largely inspired by the Milan coffee bars he experienced on his first trip to the northern Italian city in 1983. Schultz will continue on with the company to open ''the quintessential Roastery'' in Milan by the end of 2018. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

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In this image taken on Monday, Feb. 27, 2017, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz stands at the Princi bakery, in Milan, Italy. Longtime CEO Howard Schultz's vision for Starbucks was largely inspired by the Milan coffee bars he experienced on his first trip to the northern Italian city in 1983. Schultz will continue on with the company to open ''the quintessential Roastery'' in Milan by the end of 2018. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

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Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz promised Starbucks' own hiring blitz two days after President Trump signed an order halting visitors from seven predominantly Muslim countries — Iran, Iraq, Syria, Somalia, Sudan, Libya and Yemen — for 90 days, and halting the American refugee program for 120 days.

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A Utah-based coffee company is hitting back at Starbucks' vow to hire 10,000 refugees in response to President Trump's extreme vetting program, saying it will hire an equal amount of military veterans instead. (www.blackriflecoffee.com)

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FILE- In this Dec. 7, 2016, file photo, Starbucks Chairman and CEO Howard Schultz speaks during the Starbucks 2016 Investor Day meeting in New York. Starbucks says it will hire 10,000 refugees over the next five years, a response to President Donald Trump's indefinite suspension of Syrian refugees and temporary travel bans that apply to six other Muslim-majority nations. Schultz said in a letter to employees Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017, that the hiring would apply to stores worldwide. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

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FILE - This Dec. 20, 2010, file photo, shows signage at a Starbucks store in New York. Starbucks is launching voice ordering though its iPhone app. Starting Monday, Jan. 30, 2017, anyone with a device that has an Amazon device with Alexa, like the Echo smart speaker, is able to place a Starbucks order by just using their voice. Starbucks is also launching a beta test of voice ordering through its iPhone app. The Seattle-based coffee giant says the feature is being rolled out to a limited group of 1,000 people nationwide Monday. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

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This undated image provided by Starbucks shows a new bite-sized egg snack that will be on the Starbucks menu next week called Sous Vide Egg Bites. Starbucks said Thursday, Jan. 5, 2017, that it spent three years developing the egg bites for customers who asked for more protein options. (Starbucks via AP)