Skip to content
Advertisement

Supreme Court

Latest Stories

supreme_court_gorsuch_58468.jpg

supreme_court_gorsuch_58468.jpg

In this photo provided by the Public Information Office Supreme Court of the U.S., Chief Justice John Roberts, Jr., and fellow justices watch as Neil Gorsuch signs the Constitutional Oath in the Justices' after Roberts administered the Constitutional Oath in a private ceremony, Monday, April 10, 2017, in the Justices' Conference Room at the Supreme Court in Washington. (Franz Jantzen/Public Information Office Supreme Court of the U.S. via AP)

supreme_court_gorsuch_54905.jpg

supreme_court_gorsuch_54905.jpg

In this photo provided by the Public Information Office Supreme Court of the U.S. Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr., administers the Constitutional Oath to the Neil Gorsuch in a private ceremony attended by the Justices of the Supreme Court and members of the Gorsuch family, including wife Louise Gorsuch, Monday, April 10, 2017, in the Justices' Conference Room at the Supreme Court in Washington. Surrounded by family and his soon-to-be Supreme Court colleagues, Gorsuch took the first of two oaths as he prepared to take his seat on the court. (Franz Jantzen/Public Information Office Supreme Court of the U.S. via AP)

supreme_court_gorsuch_criminal_law_20671.jpg

supreme_court_gorsuch_criminal_law_20671.jpg

FILE - In this Feb. 14, 2017 file photo, then-Supreme Court Justice nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington. With a divisive confirmation process behind him, Gorsuch is about to take his place as the nation's newest Supreme Court justice. The 49-year-old appeals court judge from Colorado is to be sworn in April 10, after a bruising fight that saw Republicans change the rules for approving Supreme Court picks over the fierce objection of Democrats. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

AP_17027732875712.jpg

AP_17027732875712.jpg

Pro-life activists converge in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, Jan. 27, 2017, during the annual March for Life. Thousands of anti-abortion demonstrators gathered in Washington for an annual march to protest the Supreme Court's landmark 1973 decision that declared a constitutional right to abortion. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

supreme_court_gorsuch_immediate_effect_64939.jpg

supreme_court_gorsuch_immediate_effect_64939.jpg

FILE - In this March 22, 2017, file photo, Supreme Court nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch speaks during his confirmation hearing, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Gorsuch’s confirmation as the 113th Supreme Court justice is expected on April 7. It won’t be long before he starts revealing what he really thinks about a range of hot topics he repeatedly sidestepped during his confirmation hearing.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

senate_supreme_court_33878.jpg

senate_supreme_court_33878.jpg

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer of N.Y., walks to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 6, 2017, as Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is expected to change Senate rules to guarantee confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch. Republicans are poised to lower the threshold for a vote on Supreme Court nominees from 60 votes to a simple majority, eliminating the ability of Democrats to keep Gorsuch off the high court. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

senate_supreme_court_78558.jpg

senate_supreme_court_78558.jpg

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. walks to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 6, 2017, after speaking on the floor about changes to the Senate rules to guarantee confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch. Republicans are poised to lower the threshold for a vote on Supreme Court nominees from 60 votes to a simple majority, eliminating the ability of Democrats to keep Gorsuch off the high court. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

senate_supreme_court_89945.jpg

senate_supreme_court_89945.jpg

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer of N.Y., walks to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 6, 2017, as Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is expected to change Senate rules to guarantee confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch. Republicans are poised to lower the threshold for a vote on Supreme Court nominees from 60 votes to a simple majority, eliminating the ability of Democrats to keep Gorsuch off the high court. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

senate_supreme_court_28432.jpg

senate_supreme_court_28432.jpg

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. walks to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 6, 2017, as he is expected to change Senate rules to guarantee confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch. Republicans are poised to lower the threshold for a vote on Supreme Court nominees from 60 votes to a simple majority, eliminating the ability of Democrats to keep Gorsuch off the high court. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

APTOPIX_Venezuela_Political_Crisis_69161.jpg-d02c6.jpg

APTOPIX_Venezuela_Political_Crisis_69161.jpg-d02c6.jpg

Venezuela's Vice-President Tareck El Aissami, left, and Supreme Court President Maikel Moreno during a meeting with Ambassadors from different countries and Diplomatics at the Supreme Court in Caracas, Venezuela, Saturday, April 1, 2017. Venezuela's president and Supreme Court backed down Saturday from an audacious move to strip congress of its legislative powers that had sparked widespread charges that the South American country was no longer a democracy. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

aptopix_venezuela_politcal_crisis_78464.jpg

aptopix_venezuela_politcal_crisis_78464.jpg

Venezuelan Bolivarian National guards officers are confronted by university students during a protest outside of the Supreme Court in Caracas, Venezuela, Friday, March 31, 2017. Venezuelans have been thrust into a new round of political turbulence after the government-stacked Supreme Court gutted congress of its last vestiges of power, drawing widespread condemnation from foreign governments and sparking protests in the capital. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

supreme_court_death_penalty_99065.jpg

supreme_court_death_penalty_99065.jpg

FILE - This Feb. 14, 2017, file photo shows the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court has sided with a Texas death row inmate Bobby James Moore who claims he should not be executed because he is intellectually disabled. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

AP_17027732875712.jpg

AP_17027732875712.jpg

Pro-life activists converge in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, Jan. 27, 2017, during the annual March for Life. Thousands of anti-abortion demonstrators gathered in Washington for an annual march to protest the Supreme Court's landmark 1973 decision that declared a constitutional right to abortion. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

supreme_court_neil_gorsuch_29466.jpg

supreme_court_neil_gorsuch_29466.jpg

FILE - In this Jan. 31, 2017, file photo, Judge Neil Gorsuch stands with his wife Louise as President Donald Trump announces him as his choice for the Supreme Court in the East Room on the White House in Washington. Gorsuch is roundly described by colleagues and friends as a silver-haired combination of wicked smarts, down-to-earth modesty, disarming warmth and careful deliberation. His critics largely agree with that view of the self-described “workaday judge” in polyester robes. Even so, they’re not sure it’s enough to warrant giving him a spot on the court. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

supreme_court_neil_gorsuch_61309.jpg

supreme_court_neil_gorsuch_61309.jpg

FILE - In this Feb. 27, 2017, file photo, Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch, seen through glass, makes an animated gesture while speaking with staff members before his meeting with Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M., on Capitol Hill in Washington.Gorsuch is roundly described by colleagues and friends as a silver-haired combination of wicked smarts, down-to-earth modesty, disarming warmth and careful deliberation. His critics largely agree with that view of the self-described “workaday judge” in polyester robes. Even so, they’re not sure it’s enough to warrant giving him a spot on the court. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

supreme_court_neil_gorsuch_24619.jpg

supreme_court_neil_gorsuch_24619.jpg

FILE - In this Jan. 31, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump shakes hands with 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Neil Gorsuch, his choice for Supreme Court Justice in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Gorsuch is roundly described by colleagues and friends as a silver-haired combination of wicked smarts, down-to-earth modesty, disarming warmth and careful deliberation. His critics largely agree with that view of the self-described “workaday judge” in polyester robes. Even so, they’re not sure it’s enough to warrant giving him a spot on the court. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, file)

supreme_court_neil_gorsuch_42353.jpg

supreme_court_neil_gorsuch_42353.jpg

This photo provided by the Gorsuch family shows Judge Neil Gorsuch posing with Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia that he autographed. Gorsuch is roundly described by colleagues and friends as a silver-haired combination of wicked smarts, down-to-earth modesty, disarming warmth and careful deliberation. His critics largely agree with that view of the self-described “workaday judge” in polyester robes. Even so, they’re not sure it’s enough to warrant giving him a spot on the court. (Glenn Summers/Gorsuch family via AP)

supreme_court_neil_gorsuch_45160.jpg

supreme_court_neil_gorsuch_45160.jpg

FILE - In this Feb. 14, 2017, file photo, Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch meets with Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del. on Capitol Hill in Washington. Gorsuch is roundly described by colleagues and friends as a silver-haired combination of wicked smarts, down-to-earth modesty, disarming warmth and careful deliberation. His critics largely agree with that view of the self-described “workaday judge” in polyester robes. Even so, they’re not sure it’s enough to warrant giving him a spot on the court. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

supreme_court_gorsuch_second_amendment_76850.jpg

supreme_court_gorsuch_second_amendment_76850.jpg

FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2107 file photo, Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch, right, escorted by former New Hampshire Sen. Kelly Ayotte walks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Despite strong endorsements from some gun rights advocates, Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch has a sparse appeals court record on gun policy, one that leaves his view on how far the Second Amendment extends a judicial mystery. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Supreme_Court_Gorsuch_Second_Amendment_76850.jpg-2fc68.jpg

Supreme_Court_Gorsuch_Second_Amendment_76850.jpg-2fc68.jpg

In this Feb. 2, 2107, file photo, Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch, right, escorted by former New Hampshire Sen. Kelly Ayotte, walks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Despite strong endorsements from some gun rights advocates, Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch has a sparse appeals court record on gun policy, one that leaves his view on how far the Second Amendment extends a judicial mystery. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)