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FILE - In this Tuesday, June 23, 2015, file photo, Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., holds a Takata airbag inflator during a Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. A government effort to speed up recalls of more than 21 million of the most dangerous Takata air bag inflators is falling short, according to an analysis of completion rates by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

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In this July 28, 2017, photo, John Carroll poses alongside his 2010 Mercedes-Benz ML 350 sport utility vehicle, which contains a driver's side Takata air bag inflator that has been recalled, in Perry Hall, Md. Carroll is waiting for parts in order for his recalled inflator to be replaced. A government effort to speed up recalls of more than 21 million of the most dangerous Takata air bag inflators is falling short, according to an analysis of completion rates by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

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TK Holdings Inc. headquarters is shown in Auburn Hills, Mich., Sunday, June 25, 2017. Japanese air bag maker Takata, overwhelmed by lawsuits, recall costs, filed for bankruptcy protection on Monday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

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File-This Feb. 10, 2010, file photo shows Honda Motor Co.'s vehicle on display in front of the automaker's headquarters in Tokyo, Japan. Honda is going public in an effort to debunk claims by lawyers that it knew about the hazards of exploding Takata air bag inflators nearly two decades ago but covered them up. The automaker issued a statement Friday, June 23, 2017, that outlines its defense against claims that Honda should compensate car owners because the use of Takata air bags caused their vehicles to lose value. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, File)

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FILE - In this May 4, 2016 file photo, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration administrator Mark Rosekind speaks during a news conference to announce the addition of tens of millions of Takata air bag inflators to the largest automotive recall in history in Washington. Rosekind, who leaves his job leading the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration on Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, said the agency has taken steps to modernize and change its relationship with automakers so they try to stop problems rather than reacting to deaths and injuries. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)