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Ted Williams played his entire 19-year MLB career as a left fielder for the Boston Red Sox from 1939 to 1960, only interrupted by service time during World War II and the Korean War. In January 1942, after World War II began, Williams was drafted into the military, being put into Class 1-A. Williams joined the Navy Reserve on May 22, 1942, went on active duty in 1943, and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps as a Naval Aviator on May 2, 1944. Williams also played on the baseball team in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, along with his Red Sox teammate Johnny Pesky in pre-flight training, after eight weeks in Amherst, Massachusetts, and the Civilian Pilot Training Course. While on the baseball team, Williams was sent back to Fenway Park on July 12, 1943 to play on an All-Star team managed by Babe Ruth. Williams retired from playing in 1960. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966, in his first year of eligibility.

TedWilliams

TedWilliams

1. Ted Williams (1939-1960) was a nineteen-time All-Star, a two-time American League MVP, a six-time AL batting champion, and a two-time Triple Crown winner. He finished his playing career with a .344 batting average, 521 home runs, and a 0.482 on-base percentage, the highest of all time. His batting average is the highest of any MLB player with 302 or more home runs. Joining the Red Sox in 1939, he immediately emerged as one of the sport's best hitters. In 1941, Williams posted a .406 batting average, making him the last MLB player to bat over .400 in a season. He followed this up by winning his first Triple Crown in 1942. Williams interrupted his baseball career in 1943 to serve three years in the US Navy and US Marine Corps during World War II. Upon returning to MLB in 1946, Williams won his first AL MVP and played in his only World Series. In 1947, he won his second Triple Crown. In 1957 and 1958 at the ages of 39 and 40, respectively, he was the AL batting champion for the fifth and sixth time. Williams retired from playing in 1960. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966, in his first year of eligibility

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FILE - In this April 18, 1960 file photo, Ted Williams of the Boston Red Sox knocks the ball out of the park for a home run in the second inning against the Washington Senators. There's finally a better matchup than Monday Night Football on another channel. Hillary vs. The Donald. If the debate were a baseball game, Hillary Clinton would be a reliable contact hitter with decent power. She can use the whole field, bunt or move the runner over when called for _ in short, Ted Williams. (AP Photo, File)

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Manager Ted Williams, right, of the Washington Senators and two home run hitting outfielders flash big grins in the dressing room after defeating the New York Yankees 9-6, April 10, 1969, Washington, D.C. Frank Howard, left, slammed two home runs, bringing his total to four in the first three games of the season, while Brant Alyea hammered another four-bagger. (AP Photo/Charles W. Harrity)

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Ted Williams Baseball Card

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This undated photo provided by Hunt Auctions shows a baseball in pristine condition that Hall of Famer Babe Ruth autographed for Boston Red Sox great Ted Williams and sold for $195,500 during an auction of Williams' sports, military and personal memorabilia, Saturday, April 28, 2012, in Boston. The ball, which had the inscription: "To my pal Ted Williams, From Babe Ruth," set a record sale for a baseball signed by Ruth that wasn't used in a game, Hunt Auctions Inc. said. (AP Photo/Hunt Auctions)

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Tony Gwynn helps Hall of Famer Ted Williams throw the ceremonial first pitch, Tuesday, July 13, 1999 at the start of the All Star Game at Fenway Park in Boston. (AP Photo/Matt York,POOL)

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Boston Red Sox outfielder Ted Williams stands July 1, 1941, on the steps of the dugout at Yankee Stadium before the game. (Associated Press)

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Red Sox slugger Ted Williams clinched baseball's last .400 season by going 6-for-8 in a doubleheader on the last day in 1941 to finish at .406. Sixteen years later, he batted .388. (Associated Press)

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Boston Red Sox outfielder Ted Williams stands July 1, 1941, on the steps of the dugout at Yankee Stadium before the game. (Associated Press)

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File-In this Thursday, Jan. 6,2011 file photo, Ted Williams, a homeless man from Columbus, Ohio, whose deep, velvety voice and touching story prompted an outpouring of sympathy and job offers from across the country, is interviewed an appearance on the NBC "Today" television show, in New York. Williams and his daughter got into a heated argument Monday night at a Hollywood hotel where police officers took the pair to the Hollywood police station, calmed them down, talked to them and let them go. It was a minor disturbance and the pair weren't arrested. (AP Photo/Richard Drew,File)

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In this photo taken in late December, 2010, Ted Williams holds a sign advertising his smooth radio voice near a highway ramp in Columbus, Ohio. Mr. Williams, who is homeless, became an online video sensation when the Columbus Dispatch posted a video of him speaking in his deep baritone voice on its website this week. The Cleveland Cavaliers contacted him on Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2011, to offer him an announcing job. (AP Photo/Columbus Dispatch, Doral Chenoweth III)