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Jon Schmidt, a consultant for pipeline builder TransCanada, answers a question during a hearing Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017, before the Nebraska Public Service Commission in Lincoln, Neb. Omaha attorney Brian Jorde had asked Schmidt why the company hadn't proposed running the new Keystone XL pipeline along the original Keystone pipeline, which was finished in 2010. The Nebraska Public Service Commission is on Day 2 of a five-day public hearing to decide whether to approve the Keystone XL pipeline which would transport oil from tar sands deposits in Alberta, Canada, across Montana and South Dakota to Nebraska. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

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Nebraska's Public Service Commission voted 3-2 on Monday morning to approve a route for Keystone, seemingly giving TransCanada, the owner and operator of the project, the last green light it needs to finish the $8 billion Canada-to-Texas pipeline. (Associated Press/File)

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Tony Palmer, TransCanada senior vice-president, testifies before the Nebraska Public Service Commission in Lincoln, Neb., Monday, Aug. 7, 2017. The Nebraska Public Service Commission is holding a five-day public hearing to decide whether to approve TransCanada's Keystone XL pipeline which would transport oil from tar sands deposits in Alberta, Canada, across Montana and South Dakota to Nebraska. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

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Attorney Dave Domina gestures as he questions Tony Palmer, TransCanada senior vice-president, unseen, who testified before the Nebraska Public Service Commission in Lincoln, Neb., Monday, Aug. 7, 2017. The Nebraska Public Service Commission is holding a five-day public hearing to decide whether to approve TransCanada's Keystone XL pipeline which would transport oil from tar sands deposits in Alberta, Canada, across Montana and South Dakota to Nebraska. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

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TransCanada CEO Russell K. Girling speaks to President Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Friday, March 24, 2017, during an announcement on the approval of a permit to build the Keystone XL pipeline, clearing the way for the $8 billion project. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

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Citizens ask questions and see displays, including a pipe, during a TransCanada open house to explain a proposed gas pipeline beneath the Potomac River, Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017. A Potomac River protection group organized a demonstration against plans for a pipeline beneath the river that would carry natural gas from Pennsylvania to West Virginia. (Kevin G. Gilbert/The Herald-Mail via AP)

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Jason Hamil, a project management worker, answers citizen questions during a TransCanada open house to explain a proposed gas pipeline beneath the Potomac River, Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017. A Potomac River protection group organized a demonstration against plans for a pipeline beneath the river that would carry natural gas from Pennsylvania to West Virginia. (Kevin G. Gilbert/The Herald-Mail via AP)