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This March 21, 2017, photo provided by the CIA, shows CIA Deputy Director Gina Haspel, who is currently under consideration to replace Mike Pompeo as director of the intelligence agency. (CIA via AP)

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CIA Chief Mike Pompeo went to Turkey to discuss security issues on his first overseas trip in his new role (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, file)

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Trump Pick for CIA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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This March 21, 2017, photo provided by the CIA, shows CIA Deputy Director Gina Haspel. Haspel, who joined the CIA in 1985, has been chief of station at CIA outposts abroad. President Donald Trump tweeted March 13, 2018, that he would nominate CIA Director Mike Pompeo to be the new secretary of state and that he would nominate Haspel to replace him. She has extensive overseas experience, including several stints as chief of station at outposts abroad.(CIA via AP)

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Obama intelligence czars John Brennan and James Clapper There are few more strident critics of Mr. Trump on cable TV than James Clapper, former Director of National Intelligence and John Brennan, former CIA director. Both suggested Mr. Trump is on his way out. In August, after Mr. Trump made insensitive remarks on the violence in Charlottesville involving white supremacists, Mr. Brennan released a statement via CNN. He suggested it was time for some one to remove Mr. Trump from office. He said, “Mr. Trump's words, and the beliefs they reflect, are a national disgrace, and all Americans of conscience need to repudiate his ugly and dangerous comments. If allowed to continue along this senseless path, Mr. Trump will do lasting harm to American society and to our standing in the world. By his words and his actions, Mr. Trump is putting our national security and our collective futures at grave risk.” From his CIA office, Mr. Brennan actively worked against the Trump campaign, feeding the FBI the names of every Russian contact any Trump associate made. Mr. Brennan sign up to be a commentator on MSNBC, an anti-Trump network. CBS News asked current CIA Director Mike Pompeo about Mr. Brennan’s “dangerous comments” criticism. "So, there's a long history of former directors behaving in a way that reflects the excellence, professionalism and non-political nature of the Central Intelligence Agency," Mr. Pompeo replied. "It is my hope that all of the former directors will behave that way. Because when they don't, they do damage to the CIA."

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Illustration on CIA use of drones by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

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This April 13, 2016 file photo shows the seal of the Central Intelligence Agency at CIA headquarters in Langley, Va. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File) **FILE**

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Illustration on CIA spying by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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From left, acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe, CIA Director Mike Pompeo, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, National Security Agency Director Adm. Michael Rogers, Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Vincent Stewart, and National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) Director Robert Cardillo, prepare to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 11, 2017, before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on major threats facing the U.S. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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FILE - This April 13, 2016, file photo shows the seal of the Central Intelligence Agency at CIA headquarters in Langley, Va. WikiLeaks’ release of nearly 8,000 documents that purportedly reveal secrets about the CIA’s tools for breaking into computers, cellphones and even smart TVs has given rise to multiple theories about whodunit and why. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

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Illustration on CIA spying by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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This April 13, 2016, file photo shows the seal of the Central Intelligence Agency at CIA headquarters in Langley, Va. Everything from your TV to your lights and shades can be controlled by an app on your phone or even your voice. But the allegation that the CIA and MI5 commandeered some Samsung smart TVs to work as listening devices is a reminder that inviting these "conveniences" into your home comes with a risk. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

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CIA Bullies Trump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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In this Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017, file photo, CIA Director-designate Rep. Michael Pompeo, R-Kan., testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee. CIA Chief Mike Pompeo is scheduled to arrive Thursday, Feb. 9, in Turkey to discuss security issues on his first overseas trip in his new role (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, file)

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In this Jan. 21, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, background, speaks at the Central Intelligence Agency in Langley, Va. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

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Screen capture from a livestream of President Trump's Jan. 21, 2017 remarks at CIA headquarters in Langley, Va. (YouTube)

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The Disgrace of the CIA Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

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Brennan: Wizard of the CIA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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Former President George H.W. Bush visited the CIA on Friday to mark the 40th anniversary of his swearing in as the Agency's director in 1976. (CIA)

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GENERAL ATOMICS MQ-1 PREDATOR Role: Remote piloted aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicle Manufacturer: General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Status: In service The General Atomics MQ-1 Predator is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) built by General Atomics and used primarily by the United States Air Force (USAF) and Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Initially conceived in the early 1990s for aerial reconnaissance and forward observation roles, the Predator carries cameras and other sensors but has been modified and upgraded to carry and fire two AGM-114 Hellfire missiles or other munitions (Unmanned combat aerial vehicle). The aircraft, in use since 1995, has seen combat over Afghanistan,Pakistan, Bosnia, Serbia, Iraq, Yemen, Libya, Syria, and Somalia. The USAF describes the Predator as a "Tier II" MALE UAS (medium-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aircraft system). The UAS consists of four aircraft or "air vehicles" with sensors, a ground control station (GCS), and a primary satellite link communication suite. Powered by a Rotax engine and driven by a propeller, the air vehicle can fly up to 400 nmi (460 mi; 740 km) to a target, loiter overhead for 14 hours, then return to its base. Following 2001, the RQ-1 Predator became the primary unmanned aircraft used for offensive operations by the USAF and the CIA in Afghanistan and the Pakistani tribal areas; it has also been deployed elsewhere. Because offensive uses of the Predator are classified, U.S. military officials have reported an appreciation for the intelligence and reconnaissance-gathering abilities of UAVs but declined to publicly discuss their offensive use. Civilian applications have included border enforcement and scientific studies, and to monitor wind direction and other characteristics of large forest fires (such as the one that was used by the California Air National Guard in the August 2013 Rim Fire). (U.S. Air Force photo/Lt Col Leslie Pratt)