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Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT), speaks on a panel along with Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board Chairman David Medine, moderator and Washington Times Opinion Editor David Keene, Former NSA and CIA Director Gen. Mike Hayden, and American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Washington Legislative Office Director Laura W. Murphy, entitled "Privacy in America: the NSA, the Constitution and the USA Freedom Act" at the Microsoft Innovation and Policy Center, Washington, D.C., Thursday, June 12, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Left to Right: Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board Chairman David Medine, moderator and Washington Times Opinion Editor David Keene, Former NSA and CIA Director Gen. Mike Hayden, and American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Washington Legislative Office Director Laura W. Murphy, speak on a panel called "Privacy in America: the NSA, the Constitution and the USA Freedom Act" at the Microsoft Innovation and Policy Center, Washington, D.C., Thursday, June 12, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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FILE - In this 2005 file photo, a workman slides a dustmop over the floor at the Central Intelligence Agency headquarters in Langley, Va., near Washington. Fifteen CIA employees were found to have committed sexual, racial or other types of harassment last year, including a supervisor who was removed from the job after engaging in "bullying, hostile behavior," and an operative who was sent home from an overseas post for inappropriately touching female colleagues, according to an internal CIA document obtained by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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**FILE** CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks in Washington on March 11, 2014. (Associated Press)

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FILE - In this April 3, 2014, file photo, Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. arrives to make a statement after a closed hearing to examine certain intelligence matters in Washington. The CIA does not give up its secrets easily. Under pressure from a Senate committee to declassify parts of a congressional report on harsh interrogations of suspected terrorists, the CIA is shadowed by its reluctance to open up about its operations and its past. The CIA officials who decide which secrets can be revealed have wrestled with Congress, archivists, journalists, former CIA employees and even a former CIA director. (AP Photo/Molly Riley, File)

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Illustration on Obama administration outing the CIA station chief in Afghanistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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Illustration on Obama administration outing the CIA station chief in Afghanistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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** FILE ** This undated file photo released by his family via FreeAmir.org shows Amir Hekmati. The former U.S. Marine convicted of criminal charges in Iran after being accused of working for the CIA will appeal for a new trial after already seeing his sentence reduced once, an Iranian news agency reported Sunday, May 25, 2014. (AP Photo/Hekmati family via FreeAmir.org, File)

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In this July 11, 2009, file photo, former CIA Director Michael V. Hayden says top members of Congress were kept well-informed about the Bush administration's post-9/11 surveillance program, with meetings that usually occurred at the White House with Vice President Dick Cheney in attendance. (Associated Press)

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In this photo provided by NBC, Katherine Heigl portrays CIA agent Charleston Tucker in NBC's new series, "State of Affairs." (AP Photo/NBC, Michael Parmelee)

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New EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy was aware as far back as 2009 that one of her employees claimed to be working for the CIA while still collecting his EPA paycheck, according to the deposition of John C. Beale. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

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The General Atomics MQ-1 Predator is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) built by General Atomics and used primarily by the United States Air Force (USAF) and Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Initially conceived in the early 1990s for reconnaissance and forward observation roles, the Predator carries cameras and other sensors but has been modified and upgraded to carry and fire two AGM-114 Hellfire missiles or other munitions. The aircraft, in use since 1995, has seen combat over Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bosnia, Serbia, Iraq, Yemen, Libya, and Somalia. The USAF describes the Predator as a "Tier II" MALE UAS (medium-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aircraft system). The UAS consists of four aircraft or "air vehicles" with sensors, a ground control station (GCS), and a primary satellite link communication suite. Powered by a Rotax engine and driven by a propeller, the air vehicle can fly up to 400 nmi (460 mi; 740 km) to a target, loiter overhead for 14 hours, then return to its base. Following 2001, the RQ-1 Predator became the primary unmanned aircraft used for offensive operations by the USAF and the CIA in Afghanistan and the Pakistani tribal areas; it has also been deployed elsewhere. Because offensive uses of the Predator are classified, U.S. military officials have reported an appreciation for the intelligence and reconnaissance-gathering abilities of UAVs but declined to publicly discuss their offensive use. Civilian applications have included border enforcement and scientific studies, and to monitor wind direction and other characteristics of large forest fires (such as the one that was used by the California Air National Guard in the August 2013 Rim Fire).[6] (U.S. Air Force photo)

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FILE - In this March 5, 2014, file photo, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The CIA does not give up its secrets easily. Under pressure from a Senate committee to declassify parts of a congressional report on harsh interrogations of suspected terrorists, the CIA is shadowed by its reluctance to open up about its operations and its past. The CIA officials who decide which secrets can be revealed have wrestled with Congress, archivists, journalists, former CIA employees and even a former CIA director. Wyden said he worries the CIA is playing "stall ball," deliberately drawing out the declassification process. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

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George Tenet, former CIA director, listens during an interview in New York in this April 30, 2007, file photo. (AP Photos/Bebeto Matthews, File)

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FILE - In this April 3, 2014, file photo, Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. arrives to make a statement after a closed hearing to examine certain intelligence matters in Washington. The CIA does not give up its secrets easily. Under pressure from a Senate committee to declassify parts of a congressional report on harsh interrogations of suspected terrorists, the CIA is shadowed by its reluctance to open up about its operations and its past. The CIA officials who decide which secrets can be revealed have wrestled with Congress, archivists, journalists, former CIA employees and even a former CIA director. (AP Photo/Molly Riley, File)