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alaska_highway_black_soldiers_27151.jpg

This Oct. 25, 1942, photo provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Office of History, shows Corporal Refines Slims, Jr., left, and Private Alfred Jalufka shaking hands at the "Meeting of Bulldozers" for the ALCAN Highway in the Yukon Territory in Beaver Creek, Alaska. Nearly 4,000 segregated black soldiers helped build the highway across Alaska and Canada during World War II, a contribution largely ignored for decades but drawing attention as the 75th anniversary approaches. (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Office of History via AP)

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alaska_highway_black_soldiers_07241.jpg

This Nov. 20, 1942, photo provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Office of History, shows opening ceremonies of the ALCAN Highway in the Yukon at Soldier's Summit, Alaska. Nearly 4,000 segregated black soldiers helped build the highway across Alaska and Canada during World War II, a contribution largely ignored for decades but drawing attention as the 75th anniversary approaches. (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Office of History via AP)

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alaska_highway_black_soldiers_45095.jpg

In this 1942 photo provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Office of History, soldiers work at a makeshift bench while working on the Alaska Highway, in the Northern Sector of Alaska. Nearly 4,000 segregated black soldiers helped build the highway across Alaska and Canada during World War II, a contribution largely ignored for decades but drawing attention as the 75th anniversary approaches. (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Office of History via AP)

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alaska_highway_black_soldiers_93886.jpg

In this 1942 photo provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Office of History, a soldier places dynamite during construction of the Alaska Highway in the Northern Sector of Alaska. Nearly 4,000 segregated black soldiers helped build the highway across Alaska and Canada during World War II, a contribution largely ignored for decades but drawing attention as the 75th anniversary approaches. (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Office of History via AP)

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alaska_highway_black_soldiers_66844.jpg

In this 1942 photo provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Office of History, soldiers try to free a bulldozer stuck in mud during construction of the Alaska Highway, in the Northern Sector of Alaska. Nearly 4,000 segregated black soldiers helped build the highway across Alaska and Canada during World War II, a contribution largely ignored for decades but drawing attention as the 75th anniversary approaches. (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Office of History via AP)

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alaska_highway_black_soldiers_59186.jpg

In this 1942 photo provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Office of History, an African-American soldier leans over to peer through surveyor's transit during construction of the Alaska Highway in the Northern Sector of Alaska. Nearly 4,000 segregated black soldiers helped build the highway across Alaska and Canada during World War II, a contribution largely ignored for decades but drawing attention as the 75th anniversary approaches. (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Office of History via AP)