- The Washington Times - Thursday, February 12, 2004

BALTIMORE — The FBI is conducting an internal probe into a complaint by an agent who was questioned during the investigation into the slaying of a federal prosecutor, a federal law-enforcement official said yesterday.

Agents who worked with Jonathan Luna in Baltimore were questioned as part of standard investigatory procedure because they had been involved in cases with him, said the source, who spoke on the condition of anonymity. But one of the agents protested the questioning and complained.

“It’s really relative to an allegation of how the interview was conducted, and it’s nothing more than that,” the source said.

Cassandra Chandler, the FBI’s assistant director for public affairs, said no conclusions have been reached in the internal investigation.

“Anytime an FBI employee makes a serious allegation of wrongdoing against a manager or fellow employee, the matter is investigated by independent investigators,” she said.

CBS News, citing anonymous sources, reported Wednesday that the agent who complained was a woman who was found to have referred several cases to Mr. Luna.

The agent was questioned about her private life, ordered to turn over her private computer for a search and was asked whether she had been having an affair, CBS reported. The agent “denied the implication” and “protested the questioning,” the network reported.

Miss Chandler said yesterday that the CBS report “contained numerous inaccuracies,” but she declined to deny several specific points in the report.

However, she denied that Jennifer Smith Love, who was the FBI’s acting special agent-in-charge in Maryland and Delaware at the time of Mr. Luna’s killing in December, was the focus of the internal inquiry.

Family members and friends have said they think Mr. Luna’s death was connected to his job. He had prosecuted drug dealers, bank robbers and child molesters.

But investigators have not found any evidence of a link to his work and have been probing Mr. Luna’s personal life, including asking questions about a possible girlfriend or financial problems.

The federal law-enforcement official told the Associated Press yesterday that “no employee has ever been a subject of the investigation.”

The internal probe “has nothing to do with the substantive investigation into Luna,” the source told the AP.

No conclusions have been reached in the internal probe, the source said, declining to say when the complaint was made or when the probe began.

Mr. Luna, 38, was found dead facedown in a Pennsylvania creek on Dec. 4, a few miles from Denver, Pa. Authorities have yet to make an arrest, and an investigation into the case is ongoing.

The married father of two young boys had been stabbed 36 times. His 2003 Honda was found idling nearby.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Baltimore, where Mr. Luna worked, and local authorities in Lancaster County, Pa., have declined to comment on the investigation.

They have been working with state police in Maryland, Pennsylvania and Delaware to decipher Mr. Luna’s puzzling, roundabout route from Baltimore’s federal courthouse, which he left at about 11:30 p.m., Dec. 3, to the creek, where his body was found around 5:30 the next morning.

Investigators have used electronic toll and credit-card receipts, surveillance videos and interviews with workers who might have seen Mr. Luna at highway rest stops to try to figure out his final hours.

If Mr. Luna had wanted to drive to that area directly, two highway routes would have taken him there in just over an hour. But the route he took on Interstate 95 from Baltimore, northeastward into Delaware and toward the Philadelphia area would have added more than an hour to the drive — if Lancaster County was his destination.

Officials have said he had no court business in Pennsylvania.

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