Civil War private may be eligible for headstone

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Dear Sgt. Shaft:

My great-grandfather David G. Noble died Dec. 18, 1871. He served as a private in Company H, 90th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry from November 1861 to his discharge Sept. 16, 1862, with a “Surg. Cert. of Disability.”

He is buried in an unmarked grave in Lawnview Cemetery in Rockledge, Pa.

Is he entitled to a U.S. headstone or grave marker? If so, how do we go about obtaining one?

Josephine T.

Ellicott City, Md.

Dear Josephine:

The VA Cemetery folks have advised me that your grandfather could be eligible for a headstone.

You would need to submit an application on Form 40-1330 (which can be printed off of VA’s Web site) and provide all available proof of eligibility. For service prior to World War I, this could include muster rolls, extracts from state files, pension or land warrants, etc. The VA would also need a statement from the cemetery that the grave is unmarked. Lawnview officials could follow the instructions on the form and mail it in as directed.

I hope this helps.

Shaft notes

The Sarge is looking forward to joining the VA Alumni Association at its fall luncheon Thursday. Featured speaker will be good friend Sandy Garfunkel, director of the DVA Medical Center in the District. The luncheon will be held at the Pier 7 Restaurant on Maine Avenue Waterfront starting at noon. For more information and reservations, call Leon Sanchez at 703/451-7529.

• A false rumor circulating on the Internet, in e-mails and among veterans service organizations is causing problems at the National Personnel Records Center (NPRC) where military records are stored.

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