- The Washington Times - Sunday, May 15, 2005

Tipsy trio?

“Drunk with power.”

That’s how Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada describes three top Republican leaders who have gotten downright fuddled in their “quest for absolute power” — namely President Bush, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee, and supposedly embattled House Majority Leader Tom DeLay of Texas.

Some disparity

Staff at Yale University gave Democratic presidential nominee Sen. John Kerry $20 for every $1 they gave President Bush during the 2004 presidential campaign.

At Duke University, the ratio stood at $9 to $1. At Princeton University, a whopping $302 to $1 gap prevailed. Massachusetts Institute of Technology boasted a $43 to $1 Kerry-Bush disparity.

Basing its study, “Deep Blue Campuses,” on Federal Election Commission records, the conservative Leadership Institute’s Campus Leadership Program examined 25 of the nation’s top universities. Every single one favored Mr. Kerry over Mr. Bush.

In fact, not a single employee of Dartmouth showed up in FEC records as having contributed to Mr. Bush.

Deserving pair

We have very early word that the National Defense University Foundation has chosen a pair of highly decorated World War II veterans — Sens. Daniel K. Inouye of Hawaii and Ted Stevens of Alaska — as 2005 recipients of the American Patriot Award, one of Washington’s most prestigious honors.

The senators will join an exclusive class of Patriot winners, including former President George Bush, former Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, former Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger, and former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole.

Mr. Inouye, a Democrat, is recognized for “remarkable valor” when, as a 17-year-old high school student in Hawaii when Pearl Harbor was attacked, he immediately joined the Army. Fighting in Europe, he suffered from multiple gunshot wounds and a grenade blast that shattered his right arm.

Earning the Medal of Honor for bravery, he attended college and law school on the G.I. Bill, and in 1959 became Hawaii’s first congressman and later the first Japanese-American elected to the Senate.

Mr. Stevens, a Republican, was a pilot in support of the “Flying Tigers” of the 14th Army Air Corps in the China-Burma-India theater. He received two Distinguished Flying Crosses, two Air Medals, and the Yuan Hai Medal awarded by the Republic of China.

No more excuses

“But if my mother-in-law Barbara Bush can swim a mile a day, the rest of us can walk for 30 minutes.”

— First lady Laura Bush, encouraging women to exercise every day for 30 minutes.

Mailbag

The errant Cessna 152 that flew into restricted airspace over Washington last week, throwing everybody into a tizzy except President Bush, who wasn’t alerted until after he completed his bike ride, generated considerable reader response.

Dr. Michel Emmer is one of several who says “So what?” if Mr. Bush wasn’t bothered with the news: “I have never seen a more hysterical, stupid response than the evacuation ‘drill’ on Wednesday. Where … are the grown-ups?

“First, the risk of a small light plane doing any meaningful damage is remote. People would have been safer staying indoors rather than being herded like cattle by the hysterical [U.S.] Capitol Police [and] Secret Service, running for God’s sake. It’s a miracle that no one was trampled to death or fell and got injured.”

A letter from Heather Shaw, meanwhile, reveals that former President Bill Clinton and Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton received a “rock star” welcome when they walked unannounced into the dining room of the Oceanaire Seafood Room on F Street NW last week.

Oceanaire general manager Christine de Clerfay adds, “Of all the celebrity guests we’ve had dine with us, President Clinton and Muhammad Ali are the only two that have ever received standing ovations in our restaurant.”

John McCaslin, whose column is nationally syndicated, can be reached at 202/636-3284 or jmccaslin@washingtontimes.com.

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