- The Washington Times - Sunday, May 22, 2005

TOWSON, Md. (AP) - Delegate Tony E. Fulton, an 18-year veteran of the Maryland General Assembly, died May 20 of a cancer-related illness. He was 53.

Family and friends were at his side when he died at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson, Md., said his wife, Jacqueline Fulton.

The Democrat was known for challenging the political establishment, including his own party, and tactics that at times raised ethical concerns. He criticized Democrats for not dealing with drugs, crime and other problems in the city and all but endorsed Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. during the Republican’s 2002 campaign.

Mr. Fulton was born in Baltimore and graduated from City College in 1969. He earned a bachelor’s degree in political science at Morgan State College in 1973 and a master’s degree in public administration two years later from the University of Maryland.

He was elected to the House of Delegates in 1986.

In July 2000, a U.S. District Court jury acquitted Mr. Fulton of six counts of mail fraud, but deadlocked on five others in a case that involved a scheme by lobbyist Gerard E. Evans to pressure clients with lead-paint problems.

Mr. Fulton told the jury that when he threatened to introduce legislation that would hurt Evans’ clients, he meant to force companies to contribute to community projects, not make money for Evans. Evans was convicted of nine counts of mail fraud.

Mr. Fulton was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2003. During his final General Assembly session this year, he often had to leave work for treatment and rest.

Mr. Fulton is survived by his wife; two daughters, Shelley and Christina Fulton of Baltimore; a brother, Terry Fulton; and a grandson, Noah Powell Fulton.

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