- The Washington Times - Thursday, January 19, 2006

Lorraine Garbe, 90, speed-skating maven

WEST ALLIS, Wis. (AP) — Lorraine Garbe, known as the “grandmother of speed skating” for her decades of involvement at a key U.S. training ground for the sport, died Jan. 13. She was 90.

Mrs. Garbe died at her home, her family said. She had been diagnosed in November with lung cancer.

Many Olympic athletes knew Mrs. Garbe from childhood because of her longtime link to the Pettit National Ice Center at the Wisconsin State Fair Park and the Olympic-size outdoor oval that was its precursor.

The outdoor rink, where Eric and Beth Heiden and other Olympic skaters trained, was run for 14 years by Mrs. Garbe and her husband, Gerhard, who is no more.

They first got involved with the West Allis Speed Skating Club in 1963 when their oldest son, John, started skating.

Mrs. Garbe was inducted into the U.S. Speedskating Hall of Fame in 2003. In 2002, she received the George Howie Award for volunteerism in speed skating.

Theodore McMillian, 86, appeals court judge

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Theodore McMillian, the first black judge on the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, died Jan. 18 at Barnes-Jewish Hospital of complications connected to a kidney dialysis treatment. He was 86.

Judge McMillian received the dialysis at his office so he could continue to work regularly, clerk Michael Gans said. There was no official cause of death.

St. Louis circuit attorney Edward Dowd hired Judge McMillian as an assistant in 1953, making him Missouri’s first black state prosecutor.

Judge McMillian, other judges and law-enforcement officials once went to jail to learn what it was like inside the system.

He was given a fake criminal record, photographed and put into jail with prisoners. He said he wished hard-line jurists could see where they were sending prisoners before they handed down sentences.

He was appointed to the St. Louis Circuit Court in 1956 and the Missouri Court of Appeals in 1972. President Carter nominated Judge McMillian to the U.S. Court of Appeals, and the Senate confirmed him in 1978.

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