Metro Briefs

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The Graceland Park resident was taken in good condition to Mercy Medical Center and then treated and released. She told police the man who attacked her was 20 to 30 years old and about 6 feet tall with a slim build.

BALTIMORE

Killers targeted trial witness

A man preparing to testify in a Baltimore murder trial was targeted by his killers, police said yesterday as they announced the arrest of a third suspect.

However, the motive for the slaying of Carl S. Lackl is not clear, said Cpl. Michael Hill, a Baltimore County police spokesman.

Mr. Lackl, a 38-year-old father of two, was killed July 2 in a drive-by shooting as he stood in the front yard of his Rosedale home. He was a key witness in a murder case against Patrick Byers, 22, of Baltimore, who’s accused in the March 2006 shooting death of Larry Haynes.

Mr. Byers’ trial was postponed to September after Mr. Lackl’s slaying, and if police link his death to his role as a witness, Mr. Lackl’s recorded testimony could be played in court under a 2005 witness-protection law.

Police said yesterday that they hadn’t gotten that far.

“We just do not have enough evidence to say that was what the motive for this was,” Cpl. Hill said.

But investigators concluded that the slaying was not a random act after they uncovered Marcus A. Pearson’s role.

Mr. Pearson, 26, was arrested Tuesday. According to police, he made phone calls about a car that Mr. Lackl was selling as a ruse to lure Mr. Lackl outside his home. Mr. Pearson drove a vehicle in front of the shooter’s car and pointed out Mr. Lackl to the shooter, authorities said.

Jonathan R. Cornish, 15, is accused of pulling the trigger, and Ronald W. Williams, 21, is accused of driving the car. Mr. Pearson, Mr. Cornish and Mr. Williams are charged with first-degree murder in Mr. Lackl’s death. All three are being held without bail.

BALTIMORE

Hospital employee contracts TB

An employee of Johns Hopkins Hospital contracted tuberculosis, probably from a patient being treated there, hospital officials said yesterday.

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