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Judge Bodiford replaces Superior Court Judge Hilton Fuller, who stepped down from the case last week. In his resignation letter, Judge Fuller cited a magazine article in which he was quoted as saying of the defendant, “Everyone in the world knows he did it.”

Judge Fuller insisted he didn’t recall making the comment about Mr. Nichols, who is accused of killing four persons in a 2005 spree that began at the Fulton County Courthouse. But Judge Fuller said the damage had been done.

KANSAS

Son safe; husband arrested in deaths

KANSAS CITY — A man sought by police after his wife and her infant daughter were found fatally shot was arrested yesterday at a Texas motel, where the couple’s 3-year-old son was found safe, police said.

The man, Andrew Anthony Guerrero, 23, was being held in jail in Denton, Texas, said Officer Jim Bryan.

Police found his wife, Nicolette Lyons-Reed, 23, and her 8-month-old daughter, Leah Lyons-Reed, fatally shot in their home Sunday and issued an Amber Alert for the boy, Seth, who was missing from the house.

“The boy was in good condition,” said Officer Bryan, who said the child was put into the custody of Child Protective Services.

Mr. Guerrero was charged late Sunday in Kansas with one count of aggravated interference with parental custody, said Wyandotte County District Attorney Jerry Gorman, who said he would meet with police before determining any additional charges.

LOUISIANA

Mardi Gras rebounds despite violence

NEW ORLEANS — Bourbon Street tourists Bill and Sherry Jordan were undaunted by news that gunfire had marred this year’s Mardi Gras celebration.

“We’re not afraid,” Mrs. Jordan, from the north Louisiana town of Downsville, said yesterday morning as she took in the French Quarter sights.

Mardi Gras, or Fat Tuesday, is the often raucous end to the pre-Lenten carnival season. Characterized by family-friendly parades uptown and in the suburbs — and by heavy drinking and lots of near-nudity in the French Quarter — the celebration is highlighted by 12 days of parades and parties.

It appears to have bounced back strongly since Hurricane Katrina flooded more than 80 percent of the city in 2005.

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