- The Washington Times - Sunday, July 6, 2008

THE WASHINGTON TIMES

People who fire at flying clay targets are rarely of one opinion regarding skeet and trap shooting. Skeet fans thumb their noses at the men and women who shoot “trap,” and trap shooters regard skeet as a kind of beginners’ activity that eventually leads to trap shooting because it is thought to require more shooting skill. But the pros and cons of either one are used in good fun and aren’t meant to offend anyone.

Here are the differences:

Skeet- A skeet shooting field has two “houses,” one high, one low, that sit to the right and left of the shooters’ eight stations from which the call is made for the clay “birds” to be released. The targets emerge from the houses at a high rate of speed, never more than 35 yards away. As the bright red clay discs cross in an arc before the shooter aims the shotgun and fires, hoping to break the targets.

Trap - Shooters fire from five stations in straight-away fashion. A shooter prepares by bringing the gun to the shoulder and shouting “pull.” A target is released from a hidden center location. The clay “bird” flies at 76 feet a second and the trap shooter squeezes the trigger from a 16-yard station but can also shoot from 27 yards and any distance in between.

The guns - When Fairfax Rod & Gun Club member Wisconsin comes the Kolar that with combo barrels will be between $12,000 and $13,000. Another American-made gun is the Ljutic made in Washington state. It starts at $5,000 and goes up from there.”

- Gene Mueller

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