- The Washington Times - Thursday, November 13, 2008

TEHRAN | Iran said it successfully test-fired a new generation of long-range surface-to-surface missile Wednesday - one that could easily strike as far away as southeastern Europe with greater precision than earlier models.

The Sajjil is a solid-fuel high-speed missile with a range of about 1,200 miles, Defense Minister Mostafa Mohammed Najjar said on state television. At that range, it could also easily strike Iran’s arch-foe Israel.

Solid-fuel missiles are more accurate than the liquid-fuel missiles of similar range currently possessed by Iran. The country has had a solid-fuel missile with a shorter range — the Fateh, able to fly 120 miles — for several years.

The Islamic Republic News Agency said the test was conducted Wednesday, and television showed the missile being fired from a desert launching pad.

Mr. Najjar said the missile was a defensive weapon and not a response to threats against Iran. He didn’t name any country, but Israel has recently threatened to take military action against Iran to stop Tehran from developing a nuclear bomb.

The defense minister, quoted by Iran state television, said the two-stage missile with two solid-fuel engines has “an extraordinary high capability” but gave no further details. He did not say whether it was capable of carrying a nuclear warhead.

The Sajjil’s range puts it at around the same range as Iran’s other farthest-flying missiles — a version of the Shahab-3 unveiled in 2005 and the Ghadr, which was shown off at a September 2007 military parade. The Shahab-3 missile is capable of carrying a nuclear warhead, and its latest versions use a combination of liquid and solid fuel.

In Washington, the State Department said the missile tests were not good for the stability of the region and were another sign that the U.S. plans to construct a missile shield in Europe are critical to international security. Department spokesman Robert Wood said Washington hoped Russia, which has criticized the proposed shield, would recognize the threat posed by Iran and realize the system is not aimed at Russia.

“I think it’s pretty obvious when Iran launches one of these ballistic missiles, that this is something of concern to the international community, and I’m including Russia in the international community here,” he said.

Iran has intensified its domestic missile development in recent years, raising concerns of the U.S. and its allies at a time when they accuse the country of seeking to build a nuclear weapon. Iran denies it wants to build a bomb, saying its nuclear program is aimed only at generating electricity.

In a speech coinciding with the missile launch, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad warned that his government would act against any threats.

“The Iranian nation defends its dignity. Should any power stand against the Iranian nation, the Iranian people will crush it under its foot and will strike it on the mouth,” he said in a speech broadcast live on state television.

Mr. Ahmadinejad added that it doesn’t matter who comes to power in America because the important question will be how a future U.S. administration will behave.