- The Washington Times - Saturday, November 28, 2009

Washington Redskins cornerback DeAngelo Hall won’t play Sunday at Philadelphia because of a sprained right knee.

Carlos Rogers, demoted after getting burned for a 40-yard touchdown on a double move by Denver’s Brandon Marshall on Nov. 15, will take Hall’s place.

Hall missed only one series in the Redskins’ 7-6 loss at Dallas on Sunday but wasn’t able to practice this week. Rogers returns to the lineup to face Eagles receiver DeSean Jackson, who beat him on a double move for a 57-yard score in the Eagles’ 27-17 victory Oct. 26.

“I’ll be ready to play,” Rogers said. “It ain’t nothing new. I’m not going into the game with the attitude of showing [them]. I know I can play. Obviously, they know it, too. That’s just how things shaked out. I just gotta take advantage of the opportunity I get, put something good on the field right now.”

Fred Smoot, who played 111 snaps the past two games after playing just 71 in the first eight, will start opposite Rogers. Justin Tryon will be the nickel back, and Kareem Moore will be the fourth cornerback.

Defensive tackle Albert Haynesworth remains a game-time decision. His sprained ankle has kept him out since the Denver game.

Right tackle Stephon Heyer (knee), top special teams tackler H.B. Blades (knee) and blocking tight end Todd Yoder (toe) all took part in a limited practice Friday but are expected to play. So is fullback Mike Sellers, who was pulled from practice after experiencing tightness in a hamstring.

Reserve offensive lineman Mike Williams (ankle) returned to full practice and is expected to play Sunday.

Taylor two years gone

Sean Taylor died two years ago Friday, a day after being shot in his South Florida home.

Close to half of the players on the Redskins’ active roster never played with Taylor, but his locker at Redskin Park and its contents, now behind plastic glass, remain as he left them in 2007.

The memorial sits just two lockers away from that of receiver Santana Moss, who played with Taylor at the University of Miami. Running back Clinton Portis and linebacker Rocky McIntosh, who also played with Taylor in college and the pros, dress on the same row, too.

“I look at it more now Sean’s gone that he lived his life better than anyone could have imagined it,” said Moss, one of Taylor’s closest friends on the team. “He stood for the right things. He was a guy [who] touched the ones who did really know him.”

One of those who knew Taylor best was his position coach, Steve Jackson.

“Not a day goes by, still, where I don’t think about him,” Jackson said. “It’s hard to imagine it’s been two years. … He was a pure definition of a guy in his prime. He had just turned the corner.”

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