Redskins quarter-by-quarter

FIRST QUARTER

What happened: The Eagles opened with a play out of the Wildcat formation — sans Michael Vick. But the biggest run came from DeSean Jackson: a 67-yard touchdown on an end-around with three Redskins defenders trailing and flailing. The Redskins opened with two passes to Chris Cooley but punted after Jason Campbell fumbled a shotgun snap. The Eagles came out throwing on the next series. Brian Westbrook went down with an injury after getting knocked out by London Fletcher. The Redskins punted on their next drive; Jackson reversed field and returned it 29 yards. The Eagles went back to the run, but the Redskins made another stop on third down. But on the second play of the subsequent Redskins drive, Campbell’s pass was tipped at the line and picked off by linebacker Will Witherspoon, who returned it for a touchdown.

Analysis: It obviously was not the start the Redskins wanted, but it’s certainly one they’re used to: The first quarter this year has been a nightmare. It would be tempting to say Westbrook’s injury was a bonus for Washington, but Philadelphia showed no signs of slowing with rookie LeSean McCoy in the game. Sherm Lewis’ plays didn’t look different from Jim Zorn’s — especially on the scoreboard.

BY THE NUMBERS

2 Players the Redskins drafted in the second round of the 2008 draft before the Eagles selected DeSean Jackson 49th: receiver Devin Thomas (34th) and tight end Fred Davis (48th).

SECOND QUARTER

What happened: Campbell fumbled on the first play, and the Eagles made Washington pay, kicking a field goal to make it 17-0. Washington caught a break on the kick return and started its drive on the Philadelphia 45. Sufficiently warmed up, Campbell led the Redskins on an eight-play drive that ended with a touchdown pass to Devin Thomas — the first scoring grab of his career. Washington’s defense stopped the Eagles after three plays on the next drive, but Antwaan Randle El attempted to catch the punt with his face mask, and the Eagles recovered. Four plays later, David Akers nailed his second field goal. Washington promptly punted the ball back to the Eagles, who added another touchdown three plays later on a third-and-22 pass to Jackson for 57 yards. Redskins closed the half with a Shaun Suisham field goal from 47 yards.

Analysis: The second quarter was as mixed a bag as the Redskins could get. It started with a turnover and an injury to Cooley, who wasn’t expected to return. The touchdown toss to the much-maligned Thomas was a season highlight, but Randle El’s fumble — which led to another Eagles score — killed any momentum Washington had. But the defense continued to deliver, even when dealing with unfortunate field position… until the late touchdown to Jackson.

BY THE NUMBERS

200 Career touchdown passes for Donovan McNabb after his scoring toss to DeSean Jackson.

THIRD QUARTER

What happened: The Redskins opened the half with Campbell playing on a heavily taped ankle and Cooley in the locker room. Campbell surprised with a naked bootleg pass to Santana Moss. But two penalties, including another holding call on Stephon Heyer, forced a punt. Andre Carter’s sack of McNabb killed Philadelphia’s drive, but Campbell was sacked a few plays later — another drive-ender. Washington forced another Eagles punt but fielded it deep in its own territory. Campbell got the Redskins off and running, but another sack led to another third-and long — and then a punt.

Analysis: The Redskins miss their regulars on the offensive line. Heyer continued to get worked over at left tackle. And the right side of the line, featuring Mike Williams and Will Montgomery, is struggling. Sacks of Campbell killed two drives in the quarter, though the defense managed to keep the Eagles off the board. Despite largely outplaying the Eagles, the Redskins couldn’t sustain a drive and score because of the offensive line.

BY THE NUMBERS

5 1/2 Sacks for Andre Carter in Washington’s past three games, already the third-highest total of his career.

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