- The Washington Times - Thursday, April 29, 2010

If the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) is passed, cross-dressing men in the ladies room and the classroom will be the least of our worries (“Discrimination is necessary,” Comment & Analysis, Monday). A broad anti-discrimination law protecting sexual orientation and gender identity will add more thought police to our federal bureaucracy and expand the unproductive, lawsuit-reliant diversity industry.

Worse, such a law will function as a de facto ban on morally conservative institutions. It will conscript their leaders into the service of a shallow homosexual agenda that treats criticism of sexual misbehavior as akin to racism.

It’s bad enough that ENDA will co-opt ordinary private businesses, but ENDA also will affect opinion-forming institutions such as media outlets and colleges, significantly biasing the range of acceptable debate.

Conservatives often miss that political correctness and media bias are artifacts of discrimination laws and the bureaucracies they enable. While concerns about ENDA’s impact on the average citizen have merit, the proposal’s overreaching transformation of society is the major issue. Religious groups’ response to ENDA may be muffled by its apparent concessions and exemptions for religious institutions. No one should be deceived.


ENDA will further bar moral conservatives from our country’s leadership, depriving religious groups of influential allies. An exemption for religious groups merely ensures that our country’s burgeoning government-corporate ideological alliance will target them last. As The Washington Times notes, ENDA has many precedents in state and local laws. Small-government conservatives should join moral conservatives in working for their repeal. If these laws are not fought, we’ll face a government-backed monopoly of thought.

KEVIN J. JONES

Arvada, Colo.