- The Washington Times - Tuesday, January 12, 2010

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

The changing of administrations Jan. 20 signified more than just the exchange of one pretty face for another in the Oval Office. The egress of George W. Bush was accompanied by a distinct diminution of testosterone in the executive branch, a change welcomed with hosannas by the Society of Elite Hand-Wringers. The new kids at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. appear to believe that strength flows from apology, from denial of American exceptionalism and from gazing with a blind eye at depredations to the fabric of democracy wherever the damage is done.

The president’s foreign-policy team, seemingly born in a belfry, neutered at an early age and raised on a meatless diet of strained fruit, applauded as the boss offered no substantive aid to the young Iranians demonstrating and dying for democracy, even though the only way to keep Iran from becoming a nuclear bully is to establish a true democracy. And then, apparently in an effort to establish solidarity with our own hemisphere’s tyrants, the administration allied itself with Hugo Chavez of Venezuela, Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua, Evo Morales of Bolivia and Raul Castro of Cuba in denouncing Honduras for defending its democracy against a despot-in-waiting.

Our president, yearning to be applauded for all the right hopes and dreams, misreads the tea leaves and appears embarrassingly naive when he gives precedence to a nuclear-free world over the imminent threat of a nuclear-armed Iran. His priorities are as misplaced as his knowledge of history and the forces that drive despots.

So it goes when President Obama, a neophyte in global affairs, is willing to pressure allies more than enemies and gives no substantive support to those who look to America in their fight for democracy. If we won’t stand up for the politically repressed, we soil our own birthright.

PAUL BLOUSTEIN

Cincinnati

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