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“Can you link it to the World Cup? I don’t know… . Whatever happened, linked or not linked, it is something that we all should condemn,” he said.

Florence Naiga, 32, a mother of three children, said her husband had gone to watch the final at the rugby club.

“He did not come back. I learnt about the bomb blasts in the morning. When I went to police, they told me he was among the dead,” she said.

Invisible Children, a San Diego, Calif.-based aid group that helps child soldiers, identified the dead American as one of its workers, Nate Henn, who was killed on the rugby field. Mr. Henn, 25, was a native of Wilmington, Del.

“He sacrificed his comfort to live in the humble service of God and of a better world,” the group said in a statement on its website.

The FBI has sent agents based at the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya, to assist in the investigation and look into the circumstances of the death of the American citizen, a State Department official in Washington said. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the probe.

International police agency Interpol said in a statement Monday that it also is dispatching a team to Uganda.

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni toured the blast sites Monday and said that the terrorists behind the bombings should fight soldiers, not “people who are just enjoying themselves.”

“We shall go for them wherever they are coming from,” Mr. Museveni said. “We will look for them and get them as we always do.”

Ugandan army spokesman Felix Kulayigye said it was too early to speculate about any military response to the attacks.

Somalia’s president also condemned the blasts and described the attack as “barbaric.”

Al-Shabab, which wants to overthrow Somalia’s weak, U.N.-backed government, is known to have links with al Qaeda. Al-Shabab also counts militant veterans from the Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan conflicts among its ranks. Their fighters also include young men recruited from the Somali communities in the United States.

Ethiopia, which fought two wars with Somalia, is a longtime enemy of al-Shabab and other Somali militants who accuse their neighbor of meddling in Somali affairs. Ethiopia had troops in Somalia between December 2006 and January 2009 to back Somalia’s fragile government against the Islamic insurgency.

In addition to Uganda’s troops in Mogadishu, Uganda also hosts Somali soldiers trained in U.S.- and European-backed programs.

White House spokesman Tommy Vietor said the United States was prepared to provide any necessary assistance to the Ugandan government.

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