- Associated Press - Sunday, June 27, 2010

MATLOCK, Wash. | Nicholas Pouch runs an organic farm and a glassblowing studio on a 20-acre spread in southwest Washington’s timber country. Spicy mustard greens, tomatoes and corn sprout in humid greenhouses as chickens and sheep roam nearby.

It would be an ideal place for children to romp, Mr. Pouch thinks. But his children can’t be there because he’s a medical marijuana patient.

A drug task force acting on a tip from his former partner raided his grow operation in 2007. Even though Mr. Pouch’s criminal charges were dropped, she cited the arrest and his marijuana use in winning full custody of their boys, now 9 and 11.

For the past 2½ years, Mr. Pouch has seen the boys twice a month, during supervised visits at a neutral house in Olympia.

“There’s no reason anybody should have to go through this,” he said. “Why aren’t they here, chasing snakes like they like to do?”

More than a decade after states began approving marijuana for medical use, its role in custody disputes remains a little-known side effect.

While those laws can protect patients from criminal charges, they typically haven’t prevented judges, court commissioners or guardians ad litem from considering a parent’s marijuana use in custody matters — even in states such as Washington, where complying patients “shall not be penalized in any manner, or denied any right or privilege,” according to the law.

Arbiters often side with parents who try to keep their children away from pot. Medical marijuana activists in several states, including Washington, California and Colorado, say they’ve been getting more inquiries from patients wrapped up in custody-divorce cases in recent years as the ranks of patients who use marijuana swell.

Lauren Payne, legal services coordinator with a California marijuana law reform group called Americans for Safe Access, said that since mid-2006 her organization has received calls about 61 such cases.

In Colorado last month, an appeals court ruled that medical marijuana use is not necessarily a reason to restrict a parent’s visitation. Washington courts have held otherwise.

“The court cannot countenance a situation where a person is using marijuana, under the influence of marijuana and is caring for children,” an Island County, Wash., judge ordered in one such dispute. “There’s nothing in the medical marijuana law that deprives the court of its responsibility and legal authority to provide for proper care of children so that people aren’t caring for children who are under the influence of alcohol or drugs.”

In that case, the medical marijuana patient, Cameron Wieldraayer, was granted only supervised visits with his two young daughters, a decision upheld by an appeals court.

Many patients insist that using pot makes them no less fit as parents, and that they shouldn’t lose custody or visitation rights if there’s no evidence they’re abusing the drug.

According to the Washington, D.C.-based Marijuana Policy Project, two of the 14 states with medical marijuana laws — Michigan and Maine — specify that patients won’t lose custody or visitation rights unless the patient’s actions endanger the child or are contrary to the child’s best interests.

Opposing spouses often argue that they have a right to keep their children away from illegal substances, and marijuana remains illegal under federal law.

Story Continues →