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Chisolm’s spokeswoman, Alicia Johnson, did not immediately return calls seeking comment Tuesday. But Chisolm has said it’s unlikely he will seek to intervene.

“What stands between the defendant and execution is the Board of Pardons and Paroles,” Chisolm said on Friday. “And I think whatever decision they make in the case will probably be the final decision.”

Davis has captured worldwide attention because of the doubt his supporters have raised over whether he killed MacPhail. Several of the witnesses who helped convict Davis at his 1991 trial have backed off their testimony or recanted. Others who did not testify say another man at the scene admitted to the shooting.

The U.S. Supreme Court even granted Davis a hearing last year to prove his innocence, the first time it had done so for a death row inmate in at least 50 years. But in that June 2010 hearing, Davis couldn’t convince a federal judge to grant him a new trial. The Supreme Court did not review his case. Federal appeals courts and the Georgia Supreme Court have upheld his conviction, leaving the parole board as his last chance.

MacPhail’s relatives said they were relieved by the decision. “That’s what we wanted, and that’s what we got,” said Anneliese MacPhail, the victim’s mother. “We wanted to get it over with, and for him to get his punishment.”

Amnesty International USA director Larry Cox called the pardon board’s decision “unconscionable.”

“Should Troy Davis be executed, Georgia may well have executed an innocent man and in so doing discredited the justice system,” Cox said.

Amnesty International and the NAACP have scheduled a demonstration at Tuesday night on the steps of the Georgia Capitol.

Davis‘ legal team said in a statement it was “incredibly disappointed” by the board’s decision.

“The death penalty should not be exercised where doubt exists about the guilt of the accused. The Board did not follow that standard here,” their statement said. “The state’s case against Mr. Davis, based largely on discredited eyewitness testimony and an inaccurate ballistics report, cannot resolve the significant, lingering doubts that exist here.”

Associated Press writers Kate Brumback in Atlanta and Russ Bynum in Savannah contributed to this story.