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While Ridley Scott had an auspicious start to his film career with 1977’s acclaimed period drama “The Duellists” and 1979’s “Alien,” Tony Scott bombed with his debut, 1983’s supernatural romance “The Hunger,” with David Bowie and Catherine Deneuve.

He vaulted into Hollywood’s top ranks the next time out, with “Top Gun,” followed a year later by “Beverly Hills Cop II,” both with producer Jerry Bruckheimer.

The two brothers ran Scott Free Productions and were working jointly on a film called “Killing Lincoln,” based on the best seller by Bill O’Reilly. Along with countless commercials, their company produced the CBS dramas “NUMB3RS” and “The Good Wife” as well as a 2011 documentary about the Battle of Gettysburg for the History Channel.

Tony Scott said he gained perspective by mixing things up between film, TV and commercials.

“I like changing the pace of my life, changing my discipline. It gives me ideas for how to see the world differently,” Scott said in a 2007 interview.

Besides “Unstoppable,” Scott worked with Washington on four other movies: “Crimson Tide,” “Man on Fire,” Deja Vu” and “The Taking of Pelham 123.”

In a tweet Sunday, director Ron Howard said, “No more Tony Scott movies. Tragic day.”

Director Jon Favreau tweeted, “Such sad news about Tony Scott. Heartfelt condolences to his family and friends.”

Other Scott films include “True Romance,” written by Quentin Tarantino, “The Fan,” with Robert De Niro, and “Enemy of the State,” starring Will Smith.

Scott was married to actress Donna Scott, who appeared in several of her husband’s films. They have twin sons.

Completed in 1963, the 6,060-foot Vincent Thomas Bridge links rises 185 feet at its highest point above the Los Angeles Harbor. Many have taken their lives by jumping from the span.

The bridge has been used in many Hollywood productions, among them “Charlie’s Angels,” “Gone in 60 Seconds” and “The Fast and the Furious.”