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Fleming, the coach’s attorney, said Friday that it was for “others to decide” whether the Penn State case played a part in how Hoffner’s case was handled.

“In light of all that’s happened, it would be hard for me to say it wasn’t at least a factor,” Fleming said.

At an earlier hearing on his motion for dismissal, Hoffner testified that he had told his children to go take a bubble bath last June so he could get some work done. Hoffner said the children later came down in towels and asked him to videotape them. He said he never directed the kids, and never watched the video afterward or showed it to anyone.

The videos came to light after Hoffner took his problematic cellphone to work to be checked out.

The coach was escorted off the football practice field on Aug. 17 by university officials after the school turned the videos over to police, and he was arrested four days later.

Hanson, the assistant prosecutor, had argued earlier that the decision on whether or not the videos were pornography should be left to a jury, and disputed the claim that the images were innocent family fun.

Hoffner was entering his fifth year as head football coach at the school, where he had a 34-13 record. He led the Mavericks to the playoffs in 2008 and 2009, and a share of the Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference title in 2011. He was named NSIC coach of the year in 2009.

Word of the case’s dismissal was just starting to spread Friday night on campus at the university, which with its roughly 15,000 students is among the state’s largest. Sam Moyer, a senior from the Rochester area, said the charges were not a frequent topic of discussion among students.

“I know quite a few people who thought this was just him making family memories _ not a sexual act,” Moyer said. “It’s such a big conclusion to jump to, that he was some sexual predator. That ruins someone’s life.”

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Associated Press writer Amy Forliti contributed to this report from Minneapolis.