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Taking Names: Channing Tatum, Jenna Dewan-Tatum expecting baby

- - Monday, December 17, 2012

The Sexiest Man Alive will soon be a sexy dad.

Actor Channing Tatum and his wife Jenna Dewan-Tatum are expecting their first child in 2013, their reps confirm.

The news was first reported by People.com, which named Mr. Tatum the Sexiest Man Alive in November.

The couple, who recently co-starred in the film "10 Years," met on the 2006 dance film "Step Up," and wed in 2009.

Besides a baby, the new year will be a busy year for the parents-to-be. Mr. Tatum has at least four movies in the works while Mrs. Dewan-Tatum appears on this season of "American Horror Story: Asylum" and has a TV movie called "She Made Them Do It" premiering Dec. 29 on Lifetime.

Hollywood hacker sentenced to 10 years in prison

A federal judge has sentenced a man who hacked into the personal online accounts of Scarlett Johansson, Mila Kunis and other women to 10 years in prison.

U.S. District Judge S. James Otero sentenced Christopher Chaney on Monday in Los Angeles.

Chaney pleaded guilty to nine felony counts, including wiretapping and unauthorized access to a computer.

The biggest spectacle in the case was the revelation that nude photos taken by Miss Johansson herself and meant for her then-husband Ryan Reynolds were placed on the Internet.

Chaney also targeted women he knew, sending nude pictures of a former co-worker to her father.

HBO, Scorsese making film on Clinton

Filmmaker Martin Scorsese is making a documentary on Bill Clinton for HBO.

HBO announced Monday that Mr. Scorsese is producing and directing the film, with Mr. Clinton's cooperation. The network did not announce an air date for the show on the nation's 42nd president, who was in office from 1993 to 2001.

Earlier this year, HBO aired a documentary on Mr. Clinton's immediate predecessor, George H.W. Bush.

Mr. Scorsese has earlier made the documentaries "Public Speaking" and "George Harrison: Living in the Material World" for HBO.

Amy Winehouse inquest to be heard again

The inquest into the death of soul singer Amy Winehouse was overseen by a coroner who lacked the proper qualifications and must be heard again next month, officials said Monday.

Assistant deputy coroner Suzanne Greenaway, who handled the inquest, resigned in November 2011 after her qualifications were questioned.

Camden Council said a new hearing has been scheduled for Jan. 8.

"The inquest into the death of Amy Winehouse had not technically been heard," it said in a statement.

Winehouse was found dead in her London home in July 2011 at age 27. In an inquest in October 2011, Ms. Greenaway ruled that the "Back to Black" singer had died of accidental alcohol poisoning.

Ms. Greenaway had been appointed an assistant deputy coroner in London in 2009 by her husband, Andrew Reid, the coroner for inner north London. But she resigned after authorities learned she had not been a registered U.K. lawyer for five years as required by the rules.

She had practiced law for a decade in her native Australia.

Mr. Reid was suspended, and he resigned earlier this month.

Winehouse family spokesman Chris Goodman said Monday that the singer's family had not requested a new hearing.

Last year's inquest heard evidence from a pathologist, Winehouse's doctor, the security guard who found her and a detective who described seeing three empty vodka bottles in her bedroom. It appears unlikely that a second inquest would produce a different conclusion about how she died.

Jason Mraz tops Myanmar anti-trafficking concert

American singer-songwriter Jason Mraz mixed entertainment with education to become the first world-class entertainer in decades to perform in Myanmar, with a concert to raise awareness of human trafficking.

Mr. Mraz's 2008 hit "I'm Yours" was the finale for Sunday night's concert before a crowd of about 50,000 people at the base of the famous hilltop Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon, the country's biggest city.

Local artists, including a hip-hop singer, also played at the event organized by MTV in cooperation with U.S. and Australian government aid agencies and the anti-slavery organization Walk Free.

Myanmar is emerging from decades of isolation under a reformist elected government that took office last year after almost five decades of military rule. It has been one of the region's poorest countries, and its bad human rights record made it the target of political and economic sanctions by Western nations.

But democratic reforms initiated by President Thein Sein have led to the lifting of most sanctions, and the country is hopeful of a political and economic revival. Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, the pro-democracy opposition leader, was released from house arrest in late 2010 and won a seat in parliament last April.

Mr. Mraz called his appearance at the concert a "tremendous honor."

"I think the country is, at this time, downloading lots of new information from all around the world," he said. "I've always wanted my music to be here, [for] hope and celebration, peace, love and happiness. And so I'm delighted that my music can be a part of this big download that Myanmar is experiencing right now."

Organizers said Mr. Mraz was the first international artist to perform at an open-air, mass public concert in Myanmar. Jazz artists Count Basie, Duke Ellington and Charlie Byrd visited the country under U.S. government sponsorship in the 1970s, when it was still called Burma, but played at much smaller venues.

Compiled from wire service reports.