- - Monday, December 31, 2012

NEW YORK — Authorities say a New York City couple has been arrested on weapons charges after a substance used to make bombs and papers titled “The Terrorist Encyclopedia” were found in their Greenwich Village apartment.

Morgan Gliedman is awaiting her court appearance. Her boyfriend, Aaron Greene, was held without bail after he appeared in state court in Manhattan on Sunday.

Both were arrested Saturday as police executed a search warrant at their apartment.

Police Detective Martha Barrera reported that a plastic container containing a white powdery substance known as HMTD was found in the living room. The substance is highly explosive.

Both were charged with criminal possession of a weapon.

Attorney Lisa Pelosi, representing Mr. Greene, called the situation sad but declined further comment. It was unclear who will represent Ms. Gliedman in court.

CONNECTICUT

Father of school shooter claims remains of son

HARTFORD — The father of the gunman who killed 26 people in a Connecticut school shooting has claimed his son’s body.

A spokesman for the family said Monday that Peter Lanza claimed the remains of Adam Lanza. He didn’t say when the remains were claimed.

The 20-year-old Adam Lanza killed 20 first-graders and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School on Dec. 14.

He also killed his mother in their Newtown home before going on the rampage and then committing suicide.

A private funeral was held earlier this month in New Hampshire for his mother, Nancy Lanza, who was divorced from Peter Lanza.

Peter Lanza lives in Stamford, Conn., and is a tax director at General Electric.

Police have not offered a motive for the killings.

PENNSYLVANIA

Railroad calendar delivered to newspaper 63 years late

SCRANTON — A northeastern Pennsylvania newspaper has just received a calendar to help ring in the new year — except the year is 1950.

Scranton’s The Times-Tribune reports a mail carrier delivered it 63 years late without explanation on Friday.

The large tube contained a 1950 Pennsylvania Railroad calendar addressed to James Flanagan, former general manager of The Scranton Times.

The calendar includes a holiday greeting from a railroad executive dated December 1949. Flanagan died that month.

A U.S. Postal Service spokesman says lost mail is sometimes found when a machine is dismantled or office space is renovated.

Times-Tribune publisher Bobby Lynett says he’ll see if the Steamtown National Historic Site railroad museum is interested in the calendar. If not, he’ll display it in the newspaper’s offices.

RHODE ISLAND

Jewish groups battle in court over bells

PROVIDENCE — A disagreement over the ownership of a set of 18th century Torah finial bells worth millions has led to dueling lawsuits between leaders of the nation’s first Jewish congregation and the nation’s oldest synagogue.

The dispute started after leaders of the Touro Synagogue in Newport, R.I., agreed to sell the bells for $7.4 million to Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts so they can set up an endowment to care for the synagogue.

Congregation Shearith Israel in New York City is trustee of the nearly 250-year-old Newport synagogue, although the sides disagree over how much control it wields over Touro’s affairs and ownership of the bells. Its leaders object to selling, which they say violates their religious practice.

Both sides have sued. A federal judge in Providence is scheduled to hold a settlement conference Thursday.

NEW JERSEY

Lengthy city vigil recalls homicides, by the hour

CAMDEN — A vigil for people killed in 2012 in Camden, N.J., has reached its fourth day.

In the annual vigil, an hour is dedicated to remembering each homicide victim. In 2012, there were a record 67 of them in a city of about 77,000 people.

Activists, friends and sometimes relatives of the slain gather at a church to recall those killed. The victims in 2012 ranged in age from 2 to 66.

Each year since 1995, Sister Helen Cole has organized the year-end vigil. She says she finds the violence confounding. She says that if she knew the answer, she would be “on the mountaintop proclaiming it.”

The previous record was set in 1995, the vigil’s first year. It has never been shorter than 24 hours.

From wire dispatches and staff reports