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Ms. Bach said the man is financially savvy and wants to take time to make a solid financial plan and set up a charitable entity to aid causes that he and his wife support.

They told lottery officials they likely would keep working.

The ticket was sold at a convenience store in Fountain Hills, northeast of Phoenix.

A mechanic and his wife, Mark and Cindy Hill, of Dearborn, Mo., already have claimed the other half of the multistate Powerball prize.

NEW JERSEY

NYPD asks for dismissal of lawsuit by Muslims

NEWARK — Attorneys for New York City asked a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit filed by New Jersey Muslims over its police-run surveillance program.

The lawsuit doesn’t prove its claims that the New York Police Department’s intelligence-gathering activities were unconstitutional, that they harmed the plaintiffs or that they focused on people based on religion, national origin or race, a city attorney wrote in a filing released Friday.

The plaintiffs, which include Muslim individuals and organizations, filed the lawsuit in June. It was the first lawsuit to directly challenge the NYPD’s surveillance programs that targeted entire Muslim neighborhoods, chronicling the daily life of where people ate, prayed and got their hair cut.

TEXAS

Officials won’t say why driver isn’t charged

LUBBOCK — Officials in a West Texas city where four wounded veterans died when a train hit their parade float wouldn’t say Friday why they won’t pursue criminal charges against the driver.

City spokeswoman Sara Higgins said the police report isn’t finished, but investigators “wanted to get it out” that Midland resident Dale Andrew Hayden, 50, won’t be charged.

She said the reasons against filing charges would be explained in the completed report, which is expected to be done within the next week. The report will then go to the district attorney, she said.

Mr. Hayden was driving a flatbed truck carrying wounded veterans and their wives in a Nov. 15 parade when it was hit by a Union Pacific train traveling 62 mph. The National Transportation Safety Board says Mr. Hayden ventured onto the track after the warning signals started flashing and before the arms had descended.

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