- - Wednesday, February 1, 2012

INDIANA

Birth control packs recalled after mix-up

INDIANAPOLIS — Birth control pills are known to be nearly 100 percent effective when taken properly, but a recall of the drugs could send a shudder through women of childbearing age.

A manufacturing mix-up by Pfizer Inc., the world’s largest drug manufacturer, led to some packets being distributed with the pills out of order. That means a patient could have unknowingly skipped a dose and raised her risk of an accidental pregnancy.

Pfizer has recalled about 1 million packets of Lo/Ovral-28 and its generic equivalent, but the company estimates that only about 30 packets were flawed. The pills were made and shipped last year.

Each packet contains 28 days’ worth of the prescription, with 21 pills containing the active ingredient that prevents pregnancy and seven placebo pills. The pills are normally color-coded to note the difference.

RHODE ISLAND

$400K more sought for city receivership

PROVIDENCE — The cost of the state-appointed receiver and legal fees related to bankruptcy proceedings in the Rhode Island city of Central Falls is nearly $400,000 more this fiscal year than budgeted, and the total spent on the receivership is expected to reach $2.26 million by July.

State Revenue Director Rosemary Booth Gallogly said a supplemental budget request released Tuesday by Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee includes $392,000 in funds for the salary of the state-appointed receiver, Robert G. Flanders Jr., and attorneys’ fees to several firms. If legislators approve the extra funding, the state would spend at least $1.09 million on the receivership this fiscal year.

But it’s Central Falls that is on the hook for that amount, Mrs. Gallogly said, under the receivership legislation approved by the General Assembly in 2010. The state has sent the city a bill for $1.17 million to cover costs associated with the receivership last fiscal year.

OHIO

Mercy rejected for condemned arsonist

COLUMBUS — A death row inmate’s theory that a mysterious “man in red” could have started the arson fire that killed his 3-year-old son is “an extraordinary stretch of the imagination,” the state parole board ruled Wednesday in unanimously rejecting his plea for mercy.

Michael Webb doesn’t dispute that the 1990 blaze was arson, but he denies starting it and says investigators using now-discredited methods came to the wrong conclusion about where in the house the flames broke out. He says the correct determination points to someone else as the culprit.

Story Continues →