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City State: Morning Roundup

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Murder trial begins for Virginia lacrosse player; Georgetown civic group wants to install surveillance cameras; McDonnell, O'Malley tangle on TV; Police raid OccupyD.C. camp; Many Virginians without nest egg; Maryland 'robocalls' trials continue; Sulaimon Brown goes to traffic court.

Jury selection begins today in the trial of a former University of Virginia lacrosse player accused of killing his one-time girlfriend two years ago in a case that drew national headlines and shocked the campus community. George W. Huguely V, 24, of Chevy Chase, faces a first-degree murder charge in the death of Yeardley Love, who was also a lacrosse player at the university, reports Meredith Somers of The Washington Times.

The Citizens Association of Georgetown, a private neighborhood association, plans to pay for the installation of up to 10 cameras in the hopes that the additional surveillance will deter crime, raising concerns of civil liberties groups, reports Andrea Noble of The Times.

Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell and Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley traded some friendly — albeit pointed — jabs in a joint TV appearance Sunday, as Mr. McDonnell eases his way into the newfound role of campaign surrogate for Mitt Romney, reports The Times.

Police in riot gear and cleanup crews in hazardous materials suits began enforcing no-camping laws in McPherson Square and Freedom Plaza over the weekend, resulting in intense — and often physical — confrontations with Occupy D.C. protesters who resisted their efforts. At least 12 people were arrested during the weekend enforcement actions, and the majority of tents that made up the McPherson Square camp were removed along with truckloads of trash, The Times reports.

About one in five Virginia residents have almost no savings or other assets to weather a financial crisis, according to a nonprofit group's report. The report released last week by the Corporation for Enterprise Development ranks shows 21 percent of Virginia residents don't have a financial cushion in case they lose their jobs or sources of income, according to the Associated Press.

A political operative accused of using robocalls to suppress black voter turnout during the 2010 gubernatorial election will be back in court this week. The trial for Julius Henson, a campaign consultant for former Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. in his rematch with Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley, is scheduled to begin today in Baltimore Circuit Court, according to the Associated Press.

Sulaimon Brown, a former District of Columbia mayoral candidate, is set for trial today on a charge of driving without a valid license. Mr. Brown was arrested in September. His Maryland driver's license had been suspended over an unpaid parking ticket. But his attorney has claimed his client was treated unfairly because his license was suspended July 4, when motor vehicle departments in Maryland and the district were closed. Mr. Brown, a Democrat, has accused aides to Mayor Vincent Gray, a Democrat, of paying him and promising him a job during last year's campaign to disparage then-Mayor Adrian Fenty, according to the Associated Press.

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