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FLAGSTAFF — Keith Little envisioned a place that would house the stories of the Navajo Code Talkers and where people could learn more about the famed World War II group that used its native language as a weapon.

His family now hopes to carry out his dream of a museum in Arizona that also will hold wartime memorabilia and serve as a haven for veterans. Mr. Little, one of the most recognizable of the remaining Code Talkers, died of melanoma Tuesday night at a Fort Defiance hospital, said his wife, Nellie. He was 87.

Mr. Little was 17 when he joined the U.S. Marine Corps, becoming one of hundreds of Navajos trained as Code Talkers. They used a code developed by 29 tribal members that was based on the then-unwritten Navajo language. Their code helped confound the Japanese and win the war.

Mr. Little, the longtime president of the Navajo Code Talkers Association until his death, traveled the country seeking funding for the museum that is expected to cost up to $30 million. He preached about the preservation of Navajo traditions, culture and the language that the federal government tried to eradicate before he and others were called on to use it during the war.

CONNECTICUT

Man gets 70 years for kidnapping ex-wife

HARTFORD — A former advertising executive was sentenced Wednesday to 70 years in prison for kidnapping his ex-wife, holding her hostage for nearly a dozen hours and burning down the Connecticut home they once shared.

Richard Shenkman was convicted in October of 10 charges including kidnapping, arson, assault and threatening. He faced a potential of nearly 80 years in prison.

Shenkman, 62, abducted his ex-wife, Nancy Tyler, from downtown Hartford in 2009 and forced her at gunpoint to drive to the home in South Windsor. The two were in the middle of divorce-related court hearings.

Ms. Tyler testified that Shenkman threatened to kill her, fired a gun near her head and threatened to blow up the house. She escaped unharmed. He was arrested after running out of the burning house.

Defense attorney Hugh Keefe said he will appeal the judge’s decision.

NEW YORK

Robert Carter, fighter against segregation, dies

NEW YORK — Robert Carter, a lawyer who helped put together the legal arguments that led to major civil rights victories against segregation, has died. He was 94.

John Carter says his father died Tuesday morning at a Manhattan hospital after suffering a stroke last week.

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