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Mr. Dylan’s attorney, Orin Snyder, said late Wednesday that the singer had the guitar.

“He did own several other Stratocaster guitars that were stolen from him around that time, as were some handwritten lyrics,” Mr. Snyder said. “In addition, Bob recalls driving to the Newport Folk Festival, along with two of his friends, not flying.”

In a response, “History Detectives” spokesman Eddie Ward said the show continues to think Ms. Peterson has the guitar in question and would “welcome the opportunity” to examine the guitar that Mr. Dylan says is the one he played that day. Ms. Peterson said she stood by the “History Detectives” conclusion. Mr. Babiuk said he didn’t want to get involved in a dispute, but said he was “99.9 percent certain” that he examined the guitar used at Newport.

Ms. Peterson said she had written to Mr. Dylan’s attorneys in 2005 requesting that Mr. Dylan waive any claim to the guitar. Lawyers declined the request and said it should be returned, but until this week there had been no further contact.

Unlike some musicians who prize instrument collections, Mr. Dylan has generally looked upon them as tools to convey his art, much like a carpenter’s hammer, the Hall of Fame’s Mr. Kramer said. “I don’t think he’s dwelled on a guitar he hasn’t played for 47 years,” he said. “If he cared about it, he would have done something about it.”

That doesn’t mean lawyers or managers wouldn’t be aware of its value and fight for it, however.

Ms. Peterson told the Associated Press in an email that she had no plans to sell or donate the guitar to anyone.

“The guitar remains in a safe place,” she wrote, “away from my home.”