Officials reject conspiracies on unemployment rate

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Conn Carroll, an editorial writer at the Washington Examiner, tweeted: “I don’t think BLS cooked numbers. I think a bunch of Dems lied about getting jobs. That would have same effect.”

Rick Manning, communications director of Americans for Limited Government and a former public affairs chief of staff at the Labor Department, said “anyone who takes this unemployment report serious is either naive or a paid Obama campaign adviser.”

Rep. Paul Broun, a Georgia Republican, weighed in with a statement saying the report “raises questions for me, and frankly it should be raising eyebrows for people across the country.”

Conspiracy theories are nothing new for Obama. He has been dogged by discredited claims that he wasn’t born in this country and that he is Muslim.

On Friday, one leading Republican sided with Obama’s team in rejecting the latest accusations.

“Stop with the dumb conspiracy theories. Good grief,” Tony Fratto, a strategist who was a top communications official in the Bush White House, tweeted.

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Mayerowitz reported from New York.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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