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As is his custom, Musk will monitor the launch from SpaceX Mission Control in California.

The company said it’s resolved the problem that caused one of the nine first-stage engines to shut down prematurely shortly after liftoff last October. A private Orbcomm satellite that was also on the rocket ended up in a lower-than-desired orbit and burned up upon re-entry.

A flaw in the engine jacket was to blame, Shotwell said, declining to provide further details.

The main payload, the Dragon capsule, had no trouble reaching the space station; it was even a little early.

Shotwell stressed that the rocket is built to withstand an engine loss, “and though you never necessarily want to see it happen, it’s nice that we’ve demonstrated the vehicle as it was designed.”

NASA space station program manager Mike Suffredini said he’s satisfied with the engineering analysis by SpaceX.

This Falcon is not carrying a commercial satellite.