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Former mob captain says Hoffa buried near Detroit

DETROIT — A man convicted of crimes as a reputed Mafia captain has come forward with claims that missing Teamsters boss Jimmy Hoffa was buried in suburban Detroit.

Tony Zerilli was in prison when Hoffa disappeared from a Detroit-area restaurant in 1975, but tells Detroit television station WDIV that he was informed about Hoffa’s whereabouts after his release. The ailing 85-year-old took a WDIV reporter to a field in Rochester, north of Detroit. The station did not disclose the exact location Monday.

“The master plan was … they were going to put him in a shallow grave here,” Zerilli told the station. “Then, they were going to take him from here to Rogers City upstate. There was a hunting lodge and they were going to bury in a shallow grave, then take him up there for final burial. Then, I understand, that it just fell through.”

The FBI, which has led the search for Hoffa for decades, declined to comment Monday when asked if the claims were credible. Andrew Arena, former head of the FBI in Detroit, said the account deserves serious consideration.

“Anthony Zerilli was reputed to be the underboss of the Detroit organized crime family, so he would have been in the know,” Mr. Arena said.

WDIV reported that Zerilli has spoken with the FBI, but it was not clear during his interview why he chose to go public with his claims now. No listed phone number for him could be found Monday by The Associated Press.

Hoffa, Teamsters president from 1957-71, was an acquaintance of mobsters and adversary to federal officials. The day he disappeared, he was supposed to meet with a New Jersey Teamsters boss and a Detroit Mafia captain.

ARIZONA

Hog-nosed skunk found far from native home

FLAGSTAFF — Desert bighorn sheep, river otters and mountain lions, yes. But a hog-nosed skunk at the Grand Canyon? Hardly.

The striped creatures are usually found in southeastern Arizona, Texas and Mexico. But one of them somehow made its way north of the Colorado River last year.

A group of rafters camping along the river in August was headed for bed when they noticed a black-and-white animal in the bushes near one of their tents. Jen Hiebert grabbed her camera, zoomed in and took some pictures.

When the rafters didn’t see the skunk listed as one of the animals found at the Grand Canyon, Ms. Hiebert sent photos and a note to the National Park Service.

“It was just walking through the canyon, totally ignored us and was just digging away in the sand,” said Ms. Hiebert, of Moscow, Idaho. “I’m not sure what it was after.”

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