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“The public should accept that,” Hamilton said. “I’m all for getting people to come clean and tell the truth. I’m all for doctors, general managers and everyone else coming forward and telling the truth. I’m all for anyone who crossed the line coming forward and telling the truth. No. 1, they’ll feel better personally. The truth will set you free.”

The International Cycling Union (UCI) has been accused of protecting Armstrong and covering up positive tests, something Armstrong denied to Winfrey.

“I am pleased that after years of accusations being made against me, the conspiracy theories have been shown to be nothing more than that,” said Hein Verbruggen, the president of the UCI from 1991-2005. “I have no doubt that the peddlers of such accusations and conspiracies will be disappointed by this outcome.”

But Verbruggen was among the few who felt some closure after the first part of Armstrong’s interview with Winfrey. The second was set for Friday night.

Most of the comments either urged him to disclose more, or felt it was too little, too late.

“There’s always a portion of lies in what he says, in my opinion,” retired cyclist and longtime Armstrong critic Christophe Bassons said. “He stayed the way I thought he would: cold, hard. He didn’t let any sentiment show, even when he spoke of regrets. Well, that’s Lance Armstrong. He’s not totally honest even in his so-called confession. I think he admits some of it to avoid saying the rest.”

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AP Sports Writers Jerome Pugmire in Paris, Dennis Passa, John Pye and Neil Frankland in Melbourne; Stephen Wilson in London; Steve McMorran in Wellington, New Zealand; Nesha Starcevic in Frankfurt, Germany; and Andrew Dampf in Cortina, Italy, contributed to this report.