With Egypt crumbling, Obama must take more direct role, critics say

Question of the Day

Is it still considered bad form to talk politics during a social gathering?

View results

“President Morsi has failed to promote promised democracy in his country and neglected to continue Egypt’s legacy of maintaining peace in the region,” Mr. Inhofe said.

Mr. Phillips said the Obama administration’s policy in Egypt is “potentially disastrous” because it rests on the Muslim Brotherhood behaving “like a genuinely democratic political party.”

“Instead of bending over backwards to prop [Mr. Morsi] up, I think the administration should be telling him in no uncertain terms that he needs to be more forthcoming in not only protecting Americans at the U.S. Embassy, but also respecting the human rights of his own people and respecting the peace treaty with Israel,” Mr. Phillips said. “The U.S. should be tying any aid with much tighter strings, particularly military aid.”

He also said the developments in Egypt are linked to the expansion of Islamist extremism in the Saharan sub-Saharan region of Africa.

“I think it is part of a broader trend. The overthrow of authoritarian governments does not automatically lead to the development of democracy,” Mr. Phillips said. “The so-called Arab Spring has been more of a boon to al Qaeda and other Islamist extremists than it has been to genuine democrats. Democracy is much more than elections. It requires a civil society and the respect for the rule of law. Those are sadly lacking in many of the countries affected by the Arab Spring.”

© Copyright 2014 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks