Egypt shakes up Cabinet, appoints 10 new ministers

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Karim Ennarah, a researcher on police and security reforms at the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights, said the previous interior minister, Ahmed Gamal Eddin, was likely replaced because Brotherhood leaders were upset with the police’s handling of attacks against the group’s offices and supporters during clashes with the opposition last month over the constitution.

“It seems like it is a clash of egos. It’s obviously not a reform of any kind,” Mr. Ennarah said.

With the new Cabinet set, Mr. Kandil told reporters he will meet with IMF officials Monday “to reassure them about Egypt’s situation and economic recovery in the coming period.”

An IMF statement said the purpose of the visit is “to discuss with the authorities the most recent economic developments, their policy plans for addressing Egypt’s economic and financial challenges, and possible IMF support for Egypt in facing these challenges.”

Egyptian officials have said that the country’s budget deficit is likely to reach 200 billion Egyptian pounds ($31.5 billion) by mid-2013.

The implementation of austerity measures, many of which are believed to be linked to conditions attached to the IMF loan, was also delayed last month because of the political situation.

Mr. Kandil’s government is expected to announce tax increases and cuts in subsidies soon. Talk of restructuring the current system is sensitive in a nation where nearly half of its 85 million people live just at or below the poverty line of $2 per person a day.

• Associated Press writer Sarah El Deeb contributed to this article.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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