- The Washington Times - Thursday, May 23, 2013

The guest Commentary “Cracking Big Egg” (May 21) was disingenuous if not outright misleading about the egg bill. The bill is supported by egg farmers nationwide, by voters, by consumer groups, by veterinarians, by animal welfare groups, by religious groups, by grocers and food-service companies and by many others.

The egg bill was scored a “zero” last year by the Congressional Budget Office, meaning there is no cost to taxpayers or the federal government. What does the egg bill do? It simply provides for a single, uniform national standard for the housing and production of eggs, rather than a chaotic patchwork of differing and conflicting state laws that have been put into place in recent years. This is inefficient and will be costly to consumers who buy eggs and egg products every day.

This is a perfect example of why the Constitution gave Congress the power to regulate interstate commerce; namely, to ensure the free flow of commerce (even commerce of eggs) between the states.

Consumers support this legislation by a margin of 4 to 1. Consumer groups such as the Consumer Federation of America and the National Consumers League support it. Scientific groups such as the American Veterinary Medical Association, Association of Avian Veterinarians and others support it, as do egg farmers and egg companies nationwide, and grocers such as Kroger and food-service companies such as Bon Appetit.


The egg bill is a sensible, pragmatic solution to a catastrophe that is about to fall on one important sector of American agriculture today: the $5 billion egg industry, with all of its jobs and economic power embedded throughout every state in this country.

Is Congress going to ignore our industry’s pleas and leave the egg bill out of the farm bill, allowing this stranglehold of state laws to shut down interstate commerce in eggs?

CHAD GREGORY

United Egg Producers

Alpharetta, Ga.