MILLER: Huge majorities on East Coast support national gun registry

New poll of voters in Virginia, New York and New Jersey

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A shocking poll released Tuesday shows overwhelming majorities of people in Virginia, New York and New Jersey support a national gun registry.

The survey released Tuesday was done jointly by Roanoke College in Virginia, Rutgers-Eagleton in New Jersey and Siena College in New York. It shows that 68 percent of New York voters and a whopping 74 percent of New Jersey voters are in favor of establishing a national gun registry.


SEE ALSO: MILLER: New Jersey bill is outright gun ban on .22-caliber rifles and leads to confiscation


Even in the southern state of Virginia — which has gone blue in recent years — 63 percent want the federal government to track all guns.

NRA Spokesman Andrew Arulanandam pointed out that the poll appears skewed.

“Given the exceptionally high numbers of support for President Obama and Hillary Clinton in this poll, it isn’t surprising that there would be high numbers of support for draconian gun control proposals,” he told me.  

The poll does seem skewed with too many liberals and Democrats. None of the colleges said they asked party affiliation of the respondents. 

For example, Mr. Obama got favorable approval from 57 percent of New York residents, which is far all other surveys that show the president having the support of less than a majority. 

Mrs. Clinton’s approvals ranged from 65 percent in New York to 56 percent in Virginia.  


SEE ALSO: VIDEO: Emily Miller on C-SPAN about gun ownership, concealed carry rights, Supreme Court, smart guns


The survey is also suspect since a CNN poll in the middle of the gun control debate on Capitol Hill last April showed only 44 percent of Americans supported a national firearms registry.

Mr. Arulanandam added that, “The five million NRA members an in sync with every reasonable law-abiding American who opposes gun registries and wants law enforcement resources used to ensure existing gun laws are enforced — and those who break these laws are arrested, prosecuted and punished.”

In addition, the overwhelming support of voters for a registry stands in contrast to the Constitution.

The Founding Fathers wrote the Second Amendment primarily to prevent government tyranny. If Washington knows the details of every gun owned by an American citizen, then it opens the door to confiscation.

Voters need to get educated on the impact of a federal gun registration on their personal freedoms and our nation’s future.

Emily Miller is senior editor of opinion for The Washington Times and author of“Emily Gets Her Gun” (Regnery, 2013).

© Copyright 2014 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

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