- The Washington Times - Sunday, March 22, 2015

Rand Paul will formally declare his candidacy for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination with a five-state, five-day announcement tour next month, Republicans knowledgeable about the Kentucky senator’s plans told The Washington Times.

Mr. Paul will make his announcement first in Louisville at noon on April 7, then head to New Hampshire on April 8, Charleston, S.C., on April 9, Iowa City on April 10 and Las Vegas on April 11.

Traditionally, presidential candidates enter the race by declaring in their home state and then flying to at least two of the first four states that hold presidential preference contests the following year.

“It takes a significant campaign war chest and logistical planning and know-how to design and execute a three-state announcement tour,” said Michael Karem, whose experience in doing national campaign advancement extends back to Ronald Reagan’s first presidential nomination run in 1975.

Five-state inaugural swings take even more money and advance-work skills, veterans of national campaigns say.

Mr. Paul, 52, is a ophthalmologist elected to the Senate in 2011. He has the support of much of the libertarian-mined conservatives who were devoted followers of his father, Ron Paul, also a physician and former U.S. House member from Texas who enjoyed a loyal following for never deviating from conservative, free-market, individual freedom principles.


PHOTOS: Christians in Hollywood


In February, he edged out Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and former neurosurgeon Ben Carson in the latest CPAC straw poll.

Mr. Paul would be the second formally declared candidate, since Mr. Cruz plans to announce his bid Monday. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Mr. Carson have announced exploratory committees, but have not formally declared their candidacy.

Mr. Paul has the support of much of the libertarian-mined conservatives who were devoted followers of his father, Ron Paul, also a physician and former U.S. House member from Texas who won a strong following for his allegiance to conservative, free-market principles of individual freedom throughout his career in Congress and in two races for the GOP president nomination.

Copyright © 2016 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide