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Sen. Tom Coburn, Oklahoma Republican, is taking to task those veterans who are abusing the government benefits system. He said veterans' benefit programs need to be streamlined to avoid duplicate payments. (Associated Press)

Veterans caught triple-dipping on benefits

- The Washington Times

One veteran on disability collected nearly $210,000 in benefits in 2013, while another earned more than $122,000 — nearly three times what his actual military pay would have been — according to a watchdog report being released Thursday that found tens of thousands of veterans are triple-dipping on disability.

Virginia tobacco grants go up in smoke

More than $5.2 million in “tobacco” grants to Virginia communities has disappeared, leaving some of the state’s most depressed areas deeper in the red.

The most egregious examples of government waste, fraud or abuse from TWT staff. (Golden Hammer cropped logo)

Tax dollars wasted on humanities projects, critics charge

- The Washington Times

It takes a lot of taxpayer dollars to subsidize a culture. American taxpayers are spending tens of millions of dollars this year funding National Endowment for the Humanities grants that, among other things, finance research projects that look into the lives of pets during Victorian England, consider the history of black Americans in golf and study the culture of tea consumption in India.

Waste watcher: "The only way to stop wasteful Washington spending is by shining a light on it whenever and wherever it occurs, even if it is in your own state," says Sen. Tom Coburn, who is releasing his last Wastebook before retiring. (Andrew Harik/The Washington Times)

Tom Coburn highlights ridiculous government spending in final Wastebook

- The Washington Times

This year’s Wastebook does not show the $5,210 that the State Department tried to spend on a blowup, human-size foosball field for an embassy in Belize. But the fact that the project isn’t in Sen. Tom Coburn’s annual report on ridiculous spending choices is probably one of the biggest victories of the report, because it means the State Department canceled the project after the senator’s staffers asked about it.

John F. Sopko, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR), testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 10, 2014, before the House Foreign Affairs subcommittee on the Middle East and North Africa hearing on Examining U.S. Reconstruction Efforts in Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

Afghanistan anti-corruption task force shuttered amid U.S. troop drawdown

- The Washington Times

The Pentagon this month will terminate a critical task force responsible for combating corruption in Afghanistan as it tries to reach President Obama’s target force of 9,800 U.S. troops in the country — adding to concerns about oversight and accountability in a government rife with waste, fraud and abuse.

Related Articles

U.S. Ambassador to Belgium Howard Gutman emailed an abrupt statement to reporters in June saying he was "angered and saddened" by "baseless allegations" and had never "engaged in any improper activity." (Associated Press)

Prostitution shenanigans rock State Department

- The Washington Times

State Department managers created the appearance of giving "undue influence and favoritism" by quashing or delaying official probes into accusations of prostitution solicitation, sexual assault and document leaking by American diplomats in recent years, a report by the department's internal watchdog said Thursday.

Afghanistan National Army soldiers march during their graduation ceremony at the Kabul Military Training Center in Kabul, Afghanistan on June 1, 2014. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Afghan military destroys 16 U.S.-supplied planes, sells scrap metal for 6 cents per pound

Sixteen military transport planes bought by the United States government for the Afghan Air Force (AAF) at a cost of nearly $500 million were recently destroyed by the Afghan military and sold for scrap parts at around six cents per pound, prompting a government inquiry to determine why millions of taxpayer dollars were wasted on the ill-fated program.

Many of the pumpkins that are the cornerstones of festivals and events financed by tax dollars were grown with the assistance of pricey farm subsidies. (Associated Press)

Halloween windfall: Taxpayers subsidize pumpkin patches, fall festivals

- The Washington Times

Fall is in the air and local governments across America are celebrating by using tax dollars to help subsidize everything from pumpkin patches, hay rides and haunted corn mazes to an event that would make "Modern Family's" Cameron Tucker proud: launching Halloween pumpkins thousands of feet into the air.

In 2012, Illinois Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn signed into law a bill aimed at addressing concerns about private organization employees in the Teachers Retirement System, especially those who had not been teachers previously but used a state law to claim past employment service toward their pensions. (Associated Press)

Loophole lets teacher union bosses collect state pensions at taxpayer expense

- The Washington Times

Thanks to a loophole created by the Illinois legislature, retired teacher union leaders are getting pension credit for the years they did union work after leaving the classroom. The arrangement has put taxpayers on the hook for millions of dollars in retirement benefits unrelated to teaching, and further drained an already overburdened state pension fund.