L. Todd Wood — Behind the Curtain - Washington Times
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L. Todd Wood — Behind the Curtain

L. Todd Wood

L. Todd Wood

L. Todd Wood, a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy, flew special operations helicopters supporting SEAL Team 6, Delta Force and others. After leaving the military, he pursued his other passion, finance, spending 18 years on Wall Street trading emerging market debt, and later, writing. The first of his many thrillers is "Currency." Todd is a contributor to Fox Business, Newsmax TV, Moscow Times, the New York Post, the National Review, Zero Hedge and others. For more information about L. Todd Wood, visit LToddWood.com.

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While elites fiddle, Russia advances in East Europe

Not many Americans can locate Moldova, a tiny former Soviet republic with a mostly ethnic Romanian population bordered by Ukraine and Romania, on a map. Even fewer could tell you that Moldova was once part of Romania and won its independence with the fall of the Soviet Union, only to have Russia carve out a separatist ethnic Russian enclave called Transdniester, complete with Russian troops and recognized as independent only by the Kremlin.

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Pushing back when Russia tests its limits

- The Washington Times

Russian President Vladimir Putin learned a valuable lesson in 2013, when President Obama laid down his famous "red line" against chemical weapons use in Syria — a problem that Mr. Putin "solved" and thus headed off an American attack on Moscow's longtime ally.

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When the EU devil went down to Georgia

Ukraine aside, one of the most coveted areas of the former Soviet Union is the tiny but strategically located country of Georgia, on the doorstep to the Caucasus. And a tug-of-war between Brussels and Moscow in recent days shows the size of the stakes involved.

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Time is running out in Ukraine

Pro-Ukrainian demonstrators this week vandalized the Kiev branch of a Russian bank and the offices of a pro-Russia political movement. They also rifled through the offices of the Ukrainian envoy to the Trilateral Contact Group, the international body attempting to settle the conflict with pro-Russia separatists in the east. Vandals set fires, destroyed equipment and broke windows.

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As Russia ties fray, Hillary bears the blame

Hillary Clinton and the Democratic Party have made a big stink charging that Russian intelligence agencies or their proxies are behind the leak of DNC emails to WikiLeaks and the subsequent implosion of her candidacy. Some say President Vladimir Putin himself authorized these leaks, and we don't have access to the intelligence to say for sure what's going on.

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How to deal with Russia?

Many pundits have attempted to explain the rationale behind Russian President Vladimir Putin's actions in Ukraine, Syria, and elsewhere. I think it is very simple: Putin wants to make Russia great again. He has some successes and some failures.

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How Putin played our 'flexible' president

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The world's realists mop the floor with our naive globalists

After bombing hospitals and aid convoys during the latest abortive cease-fire in the Syrian War — notice I didn't say "civil war" because this is now a global conflict — Moscow on Thursday generously proposed a 48-hour window to allow relief supplies to enter the besieged city of Aleppo, which Syrian government forces are doing a very good job of reconquering with Russian support.

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Oil's price slide creates slippery slope for Russia

The sustained low price of hydrocarbons is beginning to cause substantial pain in Russia: Last month, Moscow again dipped heavily into its reserve fund to plug a whopping hole in the budget. Officials can't keep doing this. The rainy-day funds could be exhausted at some point in 2018.

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Canny Trump already negotiating with Russia

As a former military officer, I learned decades ago that when taking command of new unit, an officer has to be a strict disciplinarian. Rules have to be enforced and your subordinates need to respect and understand you are a determined person who takes your oath of office seriously. In reality, these first few months are a negotiation with your troops. First impressions count, they set the stage for your entire command.