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L. Todd Wood

L. Todd Wood

L. Todd Wood, a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy, flew special operations helicopters supporting SEAL Team 6, Delta Force and others. After leaving the military, he pursued his other passion, finance, spending 18 years on Wall Street trading emerging market debt, and later, writing. The first of his many thrillers is "Currency." Todd is a contributor to Fox Business, Newsmax TV, Moscow Times, the New York Post, the National Review, Zero Hedge and others. For more information about L. Todd Wood, visit LToddWood.com.

Articles by L. Todd Wood

Sir Stuart Peach, Britain's Air Chief Marshal

Britain warns of Russian threat to undersea communications cables

British defense officials have warned that Russia, in addition to possibly Iran and China, pose an existential threat to the Western way of life by developing capabilities to target undersea communications cables that carry 97 percent of all digital traffic and $10 trillion in daily financial transactions. Published December 15, 2017

Montenegrin Prime Minister Milo Djukanovic (right) meets with NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg in Podgorica, Montenegro, in October. Despite its small size, Montenegro's NATO bid has already sparked an outsize reaction. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Haven't we had enough in Montenegro?

Can you name the Balkan leader who has been in high office longer than Alexander Lukashenko of Belarus? If not, I'll do it for you. In Montenegro, Milo Djukanovic has held power and just about every high-level post there is over the past quarter century. Now he's considering running for the presidency. There is usually only one reason for a politician to not want to give up the reins of power — the risk of being prosecuted for corruption. Sometimes the rabbit hole is just too deep. Published December 14, 2017

U.S. President Donald Trump and Russia's President Vladimir Putin talk during the family photo session at the APEC Summit in Danang, Vietnam, Saturday, Nov. 11, 2017. (Jorge Silva/Pool Photo via AP) ** FILE **

How to normalize U.S.-Russia relations

As the Mueller investigation drags on, it is becoming apparent day by day that the entire Russia collusion narrative is false and that the Mueller investigation is corrupt. Published December 11, 2017

Russian President Vladimir Putin gestures while speaking to employees of Rostec Corporation during an awarding ceremony at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence outside in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017. The spokesman for Vladimir Putin says the Russian president has not decided yet whether to run for office next year as an independent candidate or secure support from the ruling party. (Sergei Karpukhin/Pool Photo via AP)

Russia's reform will have to wait for Putin's exit

The doping scandal unfolding in front of our eyes, with the International Olympic Committee this week banning Russia from participating as a nation in the 2018 Winter Games in South Korea, is instructive for those trying to chart Russia's future. Published December 7, 2017

Ukrainian lawmakers scuffled during a parliament session in October. Former Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili, who now heads an opposition party, accuses President Petro Poroshenko of stalling reforms and covering up corruption. (Associated Press/File)

Early promise of Ukraine's war on corruption fades by the day

Two years ago in Kiev, I met with Artem Sytnik and his colleagues at the National Anti-Corruption Bureau, along with the Specialized Anti-Corruption Prosecutor's Office, of Ukraine, and wrote a profile headlined, "Can this man save Ukraine?" Mr. Sytnik at the time had just been installed as the head of NABU. Published November 30, 2017

Russian President Vladimir Putin listens to Russian Natural Resources Minister Sergei Donskoi during a meeting at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow, Russia, Monday, Nov. 27, 2017. (Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Russia continues to prepare for war

In addition to massive increases in military spending over the last decades, modernization plans to have 70% of the Russian armed forces fitted with modern equipment by 2020, huge snap drills which readily exercise the Russian military, Russian President Vladimir Putin is putting civilians and private companies on notice that they too must be prepared for war. Published November 29, 2017

Ukrainian lawmakers scuffled during a parliament session in October. Former Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili, who now heads an opposition party, accuses President Petro Poroshenko of stalling reforms and covering up corruption. (Associated Press/File)

Ukraine corruption disputed

After we wrote in our article on October 26th of this year about Ukrainian corruption, titled "Corruption problem in Ukraine cuts far deeper than many know," we received a response from the Chief Military Prosecutor of Ukraine, Anatoly Matios. Published November 27, 2017

From left, President of Iran Hassan Rouhani, Russian President Vladimir Putin and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan shake hands at the start of the talks in Russia's Black Sea resort of Sochi, on Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017. The presidents of Turkey and Iran have hailed their trilateral talks with Russia on Syria's future as critical for restoring peace in the war-torn nation. (Mikhail Klimentyev, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Obama's legacy leaves Putin as the man to see in the Middle East

As Russian President Vladimir Putin hosted the leaders of Iran and Turkey in Sochi this week in an attempt to forge an end to the bloody Syrian civil war, the consequences of the conflict are becoming all too evident as the smoke starts to clear. Published November 23, 2017

Communist party supporters carry portraits of Soviet founder Vladimir Lenin, left, and Soviet dictator Josef Stalin during a demonstration marking the 100th anniversary of the 1917 Bolshevik revolution in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017. Thousands of Communist demonstrators marked the centennial of the 1917 Bolshevik revolution Tuesday by marching across downtown Moscow. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

A history deficit obscures the real crimes done to Russia

It never ceases to amaze me the way the left attempts to rewrite history. I find it especially dangerous that our millennial generation is so misinformed about the past, communism in particular. Marxism and communism did not die after the Cold War was won, they simply morphed and went underground in our media and education system, only to raise their ugly heads decades later. Published November 16, 2017

U.S. veterans may need to deal with U.S. corruption

On a recent trip to Chisinau to investigate the political situation in the tiny former Soviet republic, I had the pleasure of meeting with a very distinguished gentleman, a former colonel in the Moldovan armed forces, who fought in the war against pro-Russian separatists in the early 1990s during the Transdniester conflict, a small strip of land bordering Ukraine Published November 13, 2017

A cautionary tale from Ukraine on prosecutors and power

As special counsel Robert Mueller announced his first indictments of Paul Manafort and others in the Russia election hacking probe, it seems a good time to examine what can happen when a prosecutor is weaponized to attack political and business adversaries. Published November 9, 2017

The Russia narrative is dying, so trust your gut President Trump

As people like Donna Brazile slowly come out and tell the truth about the Democratic Party and the 2016 election, the Leftist-spun Russia narrative is collapsing. We now know that if anyone was "collusion" with Russia, whatever that is, it was Hillary and Bill, and all their minions. Published November 8, 2017

A woman walks past a poster warning against foreign spies displayed in an alleyway in Beijing, China, Wednesday, April 20, 2016. China is marking National Security Education Day with the poster warning young female government workers about dating handsome foreigners, who could turn out to have secret agendas. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

China's new video urges children to spy, snitch on parents

In an effort which would make Mao and Stalin proud, China is getting families into the spying game. To celebrate its first National Security Education Day on Nov. 10th, the communist government is launching a ten-minute video for children explaining how to tell if someone in your family is working for a foreign government. Published November 7, 2017

A woman photographs the sculpture of Soviet founder Vladimir Lenin during the opening of "Energy of the Dream. entennial of 1917 revolution" exhibition in Moscow, Russia, on Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017. Russia will mark 100th anniversary of 1917 Bolshevik revolution on Nov. 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

A small country fights a big war against Russian hybrid warfare

In the U.S. we are witnessing firsthand the new hybrid warfare of the 21st century — cyberattacks, disinformation, financial shenanigans, social media manipulation and corruption — a combination of weapons for which the West has yet to find an effective defense. There is, however, one small country that has found a way to deal with this plethora of threats and actually find a way forward. Published November 2, 2017

North Korean Nukes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Europe in Kim Jong-un's nuclear crosshairs

While on a recent trip to Eastern Europe, and talking with government officials in multiple jurisdictions, I noticed one change in the national security narrative that is new to this part of the world. Europe is realizing that North Korea can hit the continent with nuclear weapons. Published October 31, 2017