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L. Todd Wood

L. Todd Wood

L. Todd Wood, a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy, flew special operations helicopters supporting SEAL Team 6, Delta Force and others. After leaving the military, he pursued his other passion, finance, spending 18 years on Wall Street trading emerging market debt, and later, writing. The first of his many thrillers is "Currency." Todd is a contributor to Fox Business, Newsmax TV, Moscow Times, the New York Post, the National Review, Zero Hedge and others. For more information about L. Todd Wood, visit LToddWood.com.

Articles by L. Todd Wood

German Chancellor Angela Merkel reacts during a news conference with Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen after a meeting at the chancellery in Berlin, Thursday, July 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

Tell me again -- why are we defending Germany?

The Trump administration has been pushing our European allies to take a bigger role in Syria in the final campaign to mop up the last vestiges of the once-vaunted Islamic State caliphate. France and the United Kingdom have agreed to step up (modestly) their military presence in Syria to replace the departing Americans, reportedly down to around 400 troops. Published July 11, 2019

Russian President Vladimir Putin is welcomed at the Chigi palace by Italian Premier Giuseppe Conte, in Rome, Thursday, July 4, 2019. Putin emphasized historically strong ties with Italy during a one-day visit to Rome that included a meeting with Pope Francis. (Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Why Putin's pitch to Italy is attracting an audience

President Vladimir Putin paid a visit to Rome, not to take in the sights but in an attempt to burnish the special relationship between the two countries. The clear subtext of Mr. Putin's trip was an attempt to widen the splits in the European Union over sanctions against the Kremlin for its aggressive behavior in Crimea, eastern Ukraine and elsewhere. Published July 4, 2019

Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman meets with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo at Al Salam Palace in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, Monday, June 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, Pool)

Saudi dissident: Kingdom's economy is faltering

We've spoken with Ali al-Ahmed from the Gulf Institute several times in the recent past and with tensions rising in the Middle East we thought it would be helpful to discuss the current positioning of Saudi Arabia in the Gulf, and surrounding area. Published June 24, 2019

U.S. Navy patrol boats carrying journalists to see damaged oil tankers leaves a U.S. Navy 5th Fleet base near Fujairah, United Arab Emirates, Wednesday, June 19, 2019. The limpet mines used to attack a Japanese-owned oil tanker near the Strait of Hormuz bore "a striking resemblance" to similar mines displayed by Iran, a U.S. Navy explosives expert said Wednesday. Iran has denied being involved. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

Iran resistance organizing global protests

With Iran in the news daily as tensions increase in the Persian Gulf over multiple tanker attacks, the Iranian resistance is raising the profile of their movement against the regime in Western capitals in Europe and the U.S. Published June 19, 2019

Phil Rutter, foreground, talks breeding hybrid hazelnuts at Badgersett Research Corp. north of Canton, Minn. while his son, Brandon Rutter, watches on June 19, 2015. They are two of the three authors of a new book on raising hybrid hazelnuts. (John Weiss/The Rochester Post-Bulletin via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

American agriculture firmly behind Trump in trade war, with animosity toward Big Tech

Several months back at the start of the trade tensions between the Trump White House and China, I spoke with Larry George, CEO of the Northwest Hazelnut Co., who was hopeful for a positive resolution to the negotiations. Mr. George saw the opportunity for a win-win for both American growers and the Chinese consumer, who adore Oregon hazelnuts due to their specific taste. Published June 17, 2019

Migrants wave as they disembark at Hay Wharf, Pieta, Malta, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. The 49 rescued migrants who were stranded at sea since last month were brought to Malta and then distributed among eight European Union countries. The deal, announced by Maltese Prime Minister Joseph Muscat, breaks a stalemate that began after 32 were rescued by a German aid group's vessel on Dec. 22. The other 17 were rescued on Dec. 29 by a different aid boat. Both Italy and Malta have refused to let private rescue ships bring migrants to their shores. (AP Photo/Rene Rossignaud)

Malta is punching above its weight

I sat down yesterday in New York City with Ian Borg, the minister for Transport, Infrastructure and Capital Projects for the island nation of Malta. Mr. Borg was in the city for meetings and graciously offered his time to discuss serious issues affecting the Mediterranean, such as migration and organized crime. Published June 14, 2019

Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, shakes hands with his Moldovan counterpart Igor Dodon during a meeting at the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. (Maxim Shemetov/Pool Photo via AP) **FILE**

Putin not interested in fighting corruption in Moldova

For a media that has been obsessed with the narrative of Russian collusion in the U.S. for three years, and which has made Russian President Vladimir Putin out to be the Antichrist, it's interesting to see the Western press now spinning the narrative that the Kremlin in this case wants to "fight corruption" by backing the ACUM-Socialist coalition and allegedly '"does not want to interfere" in Moldova's affairs. Published June 13, 2019

Kazakhstan's acting President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev arrives to attend the Supreme Eurasian Economic Council meeting in Nur-Sultan, the capital city of Kazakhstan, Wednesday, May 29, 2019. (Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP) **FILE**

An election in Kazakhstan could help a region advance

The Central Asian nation of Kazakhstan on Sunday will hold an early presidential election to choose the successor to Nursultan Nazarbayev, the country's one and only post-Cold War leader, who stepped down from power in March of this year. Despite the doubters out there, this is a historic opportunity for the Kazakh people and the region. Published June 6, 2019

This undated historical image courtesy of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission shows the drawing "Siege of the Alamo, March 6th, 1836." Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush is overseeing a 7-year, $450 million revamp of the Alamo, where 189 independence fighters were killed in 1836. That includes restoration of historical structures and building a new museum and visitors' center. But some conservatives worry that the importance of the battle for the Alamo will be marginalized by "political correctness," with the overhaul sanitizing less-desirable aspects of participants' history, including that some were slaveholders. (Courtesy of Texas State Library and Archives Commission via AP)

It's time to remember the Alamo, because our senators don't

Recently, Fort Worth teacher Georgia Clark had the guts to tweet to President Trump that her school district was full of illegal aliens and drug dealers were on campus regularly. She was immediately fired. Published June 5, 2019

In this photo released by the Foreign Office, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, attends meeting with Pakistani officials at the Foreign Ministry in Islamabad, Pakistan, Friday, May 24, 2019. Zarif is in Pakistan Friday on a critically timed visit amid a crisis between Tehran and Washington and ahead of next week's emergency Arab League meeting called by Saudi Arabia as regional tensions escalate.(Pakistan Foreign Office via AP) **FILE**

Trump's full-court press puts the squeeze on Iran

The Trump administration has made the decision to push for regime change in Iran, whether U.S. officials want to admit it publicly or not. There is no "negotiating" with the mullahs in Tehran, even if multiple American presidents in recent history have attempted to do just that, with disastrous results. Published May 30, 2019

FILE - In this March 19, 1987 file photo, President Ronald Reagan taps his forehead at the White House while responding to a reporter's question during a news conference at which he said he never deliberately lied to the public, despite admitting to a misstatement about Israeli involvement in the Iran-Contra affair. In a 1986 radio address admitting to missteps in the Iran-Contra scandal, the president famously said "mistakes were made" - a passive acknowledgement of wrongdoing that didn't directly implicate anyone. (AP Photo/Dennis Cook, File)

Feels like Reagan

I was 16 when Ronald Reagan came into office. I was on the cusp of becoming politically aware, and interested in international affairs. Although I couldn't really explain why at that young age, I instinctively knew I was experiencing something really special living through the Reagan presidency. Published May 29, 2019

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama D-Ill., and his vice presidential running mate Sen. Joe Biden, D-Del., appear together Saturday, Aug. 23, 2008, in Springfield, Ill. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

Obama was Islam's Manchurian candidate, Biden is China's

We've written extensively here about the absolute corruption and dual loyalties of the Obama administration. Our main point has been that to analyze Barack Obama's record, you cannot listen to his eloquent words, but have to discern the malign consequences of his actions, an Islamic caliphate flourishing in the Middle East being in the forefront. Published May 22, 2019

U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, left, talks with Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk during a meeting in Kiev, Ukraine, Friday, Nov. 21, 2014. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

Sketchy Biden, Ukraine memo should be handled with care

Earlier this week, a memo surfaced in Ukraine, allegedly revealing how former Vice President Joseph R. Biden accepted an "unlawful benefit" from his son's financial ties to local oil and gas producer Burisma. Published May 16, 2019